doping


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Related to doping: blood doping, semiconductor

dop·ing

(dōp'ing),
The administration of foreign substances to an individual; often used in reference to athletes who try to stimulate physical and psychological strength.

doping

(dō′pĭng)
n.
The use of a drug, such as a steroid or a blood product, such as erythropoietin, to improve athletic performance.
Sports medicine Any use of drugs and other nonfood substances to improve performance; the Olympic Committee defines doping as one or more anti-doping rule violations set forth in Article 2.1-2.8, IOC Anti-Doping Rules

doping

Sports medicine Popular for the use of drugs and other nonfood substances to improve performance. See Anabolic steroids, Blood doping, Weight training.

dop·ing

(dōp'ing)
The administration of foreign substances to a human or animal; often used in reference to athletes who try to enhance physiologic function and exercise performance.
See also: blood doping

doping

the use of banned substances or methods (as defined and listed by WADA) in sport to attempt to gain an unfair advantage. Considered to derive from the South African word 'dop' for a stimulant drink first given to racehorses. The WADA list is an agreed table of both synthetic and naturally occurring substances considered to offer an advantage when taken during training and competition. Sportsmen and women take performance-enhancing substances for a number of reasons. These include the physical effects of the drug itself (anabolic steroids will allow the athlete to train harder, faster and for longer), the pressure on the athlete to succeed (from coach, family, sponsors, media and general public) and the direct effect on athletes themselves (to boost confidence, lessen anxiety, etc.). See also banned substance; Drugs and the law.

doping

the illicit administration of drugs or other agents to racing animals with the intention of altering their physical performance, either adversely or positively. Called also sting.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Convention, which was adopted in 2005, is based on the World Anti-Doping Code, where States commit to restrict trafficking in doping substances; apply common practices to control use by athletes in competitions; improve detection techniques; and support education and deterrence.
The consideration of two actors and one institution gives an initial answer to the question of whether doping is an exception, or is inherent in professional cycling.
He hinted about examples of successful researches like EPO (2000), Ara-Nesp (2002), HBOCs (2004), 5-alfa reductase inhibitors (2004), Athletes' Biological Passport, Gene doping detection (Baoutina A et al 2013).
The most recent version of these rules (which is contained in the World Anti-Doping Code) was adopted at the World Conference on Doping in Sport last November.
The increase in the number of athletes who tested positive for doping is evidence of our battle against doping.
Ullrich, the 1997 Tour winner, has already admitted to blood doping and was last year stripped of his third-place finish in the 2005 Tour.
He slammed the ruling that 211 bags of blood seized in a blood doping probe should be destroyed as "the biggest cover-up in sports history".
Summary: Lance Armstrong will talk about his lifetime ban from cycling and the doping charges against him in a TV interview with Oprah Winfrey.
CYCLING: Team Sky have reiterated their zerotolerance stance to doping in the wake of the United States Anti-Doping Agency report which has rocked cycling.
Lance Armstrong and his team ran the most sophisticated doping programme in sport according to the US Anti-Doping Agency (USDA) which released its report on the case against the US Postal cycling team
A recurring aspect of the Code discussion is the tension between the necessity to harmonize anti-doping rules on the one hand, and the wish to treat individual doping cases individually on the other hand.
In other words, with the ABP, a doping finding is based on circumstantial evidence, not direct evidence of use.