dopamine hypothesis


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dopamine hypothesis

Psychiatry A theory that attempts to explain the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and other psychotic states as due to excess dopamine activity in various areas of the brain
References in periodicals archive ?
The dopamine hypothesis of drug addiction and its potential therapeutic value.
Dopamine hypothesis is the hypothesis that hallucination and delusion with schizophrenia are caused by excess of dopamine.
Thus glutamate hypothesis fit in the characteristics of schizophrenia, so it has become the most predominant next to dopamine hypothesis.
It was around the time of this recognized failure that the one researcher made the first formal articulation of the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia (Rossum, 1966).
In the wake of the success of the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia, speculative hypotheses failing to proffer empirical support received little attention in research.
Antipsychotic drugs work by modulating dopaminergic neurotransmission, and by doing so, they provide powerful evidence for the dopamine hypothesis of psychosis (Howes & Kapur, 2009).
After a lengthy review of the evidence for and against the dopamine hypothesis, one psychiatrist proposed that antipsychotics primarily work not by modifying dopamine but instead by inducing neurocognitive suppression, which diminishes the severity of psychotic symptoms (Moncrieff, 2009).
Historical development of the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia.
This result would be consistent with Lambert's (1992) dopamine hypothesis.
Further support for the dopamine hypothesis may come with future investigation of the effects of selective dopamine antagonists on responding reinforced by the opportunity to run.