donor card


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donor card

n.
A card, usually carried on one's person, authorizing the use of one's bodily organs for transplantation in the event of one's death.

donor card

Etymology: L, donare, to give, charta
a document in which a person offers to make an anatomical gift of body parts, at the time of death, for transplantation to recipients needing replacement of vital organs or tissues. The information can also be found on a state driver's license. Consent for organ donation generally requires consent from family of the organ donor.
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UNIFORM DONOR CARD

donor card

A document used by a person who wishes to make an anatomical gift, at the time of his or her death, of an organ or other body part needed for transplantation.
See: illustration; transplantation
References in periodicals archive ?
Organ Donor Awareness Week - RTE's Joe Duffy is its ambassador - has been encouraging people to carry a donor card.
However, by and large, most have not signed a donor card and have not designated themselves as organ donors on a driver's license.
Should people have to carry a donor card or should it be presumed that everyone will donate organs?
The pink sticker would fall off or people didn't carry their donor card in their wallet,'' he said.
At the time of death, family members are asked to sign a consent form at the hospital, even if the patient has a donor card.
Consequently, a strong volunteer identity will lead to signing an organ donor card.
For more details on registering for a donor card call (0117) 931-4638 or visit www.
Jagmohan carried a donor card with him and so we thought he obviously wanted to do something.
She urged everyone to considering carrying a donor card and said she hoped that by 2010 the number of people on the official Organ Donor Register would have risen from 10.
The panel on legal issues related to organ transplants, led by Saku Machino, a professor at Sophia University, says in its report that the current law's requirement that donors sign an organ donor card before brain death should be abolished, the sources said.
The organ transplant law permits the transplant of hearts, lungs, livers, kidneys, pancreases, small intestines and eyes from donors aged 15 or older who had signed an organ donor card.
The family then provided the hospital with three kinds of donor cards, one allowing the patient's organs to be used for organ transplant operations in the event of brain death, a donor card to provide for the patient's kidneys and another for the patient's corneas, the sources said.