donor


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Related to donor: organ donor, Donor atom, Sperm donor

donor

 [do´ner]
1. a person or organism that supplies an organ or tissue to be used in another body, usually either a cadaveric, living related, or living unrelated donor; see transplantation.
2. a substance or compound that contributes part of itself to another substance (acceptor).
Algorithm for organ donation. From McQuillan, 2002.
cadaveric donor an organ or tissue donor who has already died; see cadaveric donor transplantation.
living nonrelated donor living unrelated donor.
living related donor one who is a close blood relative of the recipient; see living related donor transplantation.
living unrelated donor one who is not a close blood relative of the recipient; see living unrelated donor transplantation.
non–heart beating cadaveric donor a donor who has been pronounced dead according to the traditional criteria of lack of any pulse or detectable cardiac activity, but is not yet brain dead (see brain death). There are two types: The controlled donor is a person in a vegetative state who has signed a consent form or otherwise stated his or her wishes before becoming ill. Based on the patient's stated wishes and at the request of the next-of-kin, cannulas are placed into blood vessels for postmortem cooling of organs and the person is removed from life support. Once death has been declared, the organs are rapidly perfused with cold preservative solution and surgically removed. The uncontrolled donor is a person declared dead because of catastrophic injury to the heart, such as a gunshot wound to the heart. Cannulas are placed into blood vessels after death and the organs are perfused and removed. This also requires consent of next-of-kin.
universal donor a person whose blood is type O in the ABO blood group system; such blood is sometimes used in emergency transfusion. Transfusion of blood cells rather than whole blood is preferred.

do·nor

(dō'nŏr),
1. A person from whom blood, tissue, or an organ is taken for transplantation.
2. A compound that will transfer an atom or a radical to an acceptor; for example, methionine is a methyl donor; glutathione is a glutamyl donor.
3. An atom that readily yields electrons to an acceptor, for example, nitrogen, which will donate both electrons to a shared pool in forming a coordinate bond.
[L. dono, pp. donatus, to donate, to give]

donor

/do·nor/ (do´ner)
1. an organism that supplies living tissue to be used in another body, as a person who furnishes blood for transfusion, or an organ for transplantation.
2. a substance or compound that contributes part of itself to another substance (acceptor).

universal donor  a person whose blood is type O in the ABO blood group system; such blood is sometimes used in emergency transfusion.

donor

(dō′nər)
n.
1. Medicine An individual from whom blood, tissue, or an organ is taken for transfusion, implantation, or transplant.
2. Chemistry An atom, molecule, or ion that provides a part to combine with an acceptor, especially an atom that provides two electrons to form a bond with another atom.
3. Electronics An element introduced into a semiconductor with a negative valence greater than that of the pure semiconductor.
adj.
Medicine Used for transfusion, implantation, or transplant: a donor organ.

donor

[dō′nər]
Etymology: L, donare, to give
1 a human or other organism that gives living tissue to be used in another body, for example, blood for transfusion or a kidney for transplantation.
2 a substance or compound that gives part of itself to another substance. Compare acceptor. See also universal donor.

donor

The giver of a tissue, an organ, blood or blood products; in the usual parlance, an altruistic person who contributes blood products, often regularly. See Anencephalic organ donor, Oxydonor, Universal donor.

do·nor

(dō'nŏr)
1. A person from whom blood, tissue, or an organ is taken for transplantation.
2. A compound that will transfer an atom or a radical to an acceptor.
3. An atom that readily yields electrons to an acceptor.
[L. dono, pp. donatus, to donate, to give]

donor

A person, or cadaver, from whom blood, tissue or an organ is taken for transfusion or transplantation into another.

donor

an individual supplying tissue (e.g. blood), genetic material to a recipient. See COMPATIBILITY, ABO BLOOD GROUP, UNIVERSAL DONOR RECIPIENT, CONJUGATION.

Donor

A healthy person who contributes bone marrow for transplantation.

donor

1. an organism that supplies living tissue to be used in another body, as an animal which furnishes blood for transfusion, or an organ for transplantation.
2. a substance or compound that contributes part of itself to another substance (acceptor).
References in periodicals archive ?
Donors were questioned, inconfidence, about specific risk behaviour, travel history and other factors that potentially affect donor or recipient safety.
A donor also is more likely to remain committed if there is a perception that the consequences of failing to give will be negative or harmful than if the donor is left to wonder whether a gift makes a difference.
Donor recruitment agencies are famously aggressive, a phenomenon long observed in organ procurement.
Lifetime contributions generally allow the donor a charitable deduction (if it exceeds the percent-of-income limit, the deduction carries forward for five years; see Sec.
If you consider there are about 23 million drivers in this state, that's upwards of 17 million people willing to be organ and tissue donors after they die.
Effective stewardship of existing accounts is critical, too, both when requesting additional contributions from prior donors and when approaching new donors.
In response to a comment made by a living donor advocacy organization that OPTN policies should not interfere with the right of an altruistic living donor's right to direct the donation, HRSA agreed and directed the OPTN to develop living donor allocations policies that include right to directed donation.
We've got demographics on our side," she said, citing studies that have shown that "the biggest donors and donors to the church in Canada is a very large part of all donors to charitable organizations.
An assessment of endotoxin transfer will assist in further defining the risks associated with organ transplantation from donors with N.
It is significant that the relevant statute (General Obligations Law Section 5-1 501) was amended in 1994 to require the donor of the power to initial those boxes which set forth the matters for which the power is being granted to the attorney-in-fact.
Donors self-select those organizations that reflect their values.