donkey

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donkey

a member of the family Equidae, descended from the wild ass of which there are still many varieties. Characteristically gray to sable in color, short of stature, long, floppy-eared and with a bray as a call instead of a whinny. Many have a dorsal and shoulder stripes. The male participates in the development of the mule and the female in the production of the hinny. Males are jacks, females are jennies. Called also ass, burro.
Enlarge picture
Donkey. By permission from Sambraus HH,Livestock Breeds, Mosby, 1992

donkey foot
an upright, narrow foot with a small sole area and usually a poorly developed frog. Works well on a donkey but in a horse expected to do fast, hard work it causes chronic mild lameness. All four feet are affected.
References in classic literature ?
We were scaring away the foxes," said one of the donkeys, meekly.
There was a muleteer to every donkey and a dozen volunteers beside, and they banged the donkeys with their goad sticks, and pricked them with their spikes, and shouted something that sounded like "Sekki- yah
I much prefer riding one of these donkeys," cried Pinocchio.
No sooner, however, had she swallowed them than she lost human form, and ran into the courtyard in the shape of a donkey.
Now let's leave the donkey and go on to other matters.
No man never see a dead donkey 'cept the gen'l'm'n in the black silk smalls as know'd the young 'ooman as kep' a goat; and that wos a French donkey, so wery likely he warn't wun o' the reg'lar breed.
The English fell silent; the natives who walked beside the donkeys broke into queer wavering songs and tossed jokes from one to the other.
His bedstead, covered with a tumbled and ragged piece of patchwork, was in the den he had come from, where another little window showed a prospect of more stinging-nettles, and a lame donkey.
The men said: "Aren't you ashamed of yourself for overloading that poor donkey of yours and your hulking son?
But it's good advice for the foolish," said the donkey, admiringly.
An old gypsy woman was seated on the ground nursing her knees, and occasionally poking a skewer into the round kettle that sent forth an odorous steam; two small shock-headed children were lying prone and resting on their elbows something like small sphinxes; and a placid donkey was bending his head over a tall girl, who, lying on her back, was scratching his nose and indulging him with a bite of excellent stolen hay.
Gamfield growled a fierce imprecation on the donkey generally, but more particularly on his eyes; and, running after him, bestowed a blow on his head, which would inevitably have beaten in any skull but a donkey's.