dong quai


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Related to dong quai: black cohosh, Chasteberry

dong quai

(doong kwa) (-kwi) Angelica sinensis (Chinese angelica), or its root, a preparation of which is used for gynecologic disorders.

dong quai

(do͝ong kwā, kwī)
n.
A perennial aromatic herb (Angelica sinensis) in the parsley family, native to China and Japan, yielding a root that is used medicinally for gynecological disorders such as premenstrual syndrome, menstrual cramps, and menopausal symptoms.

dong quai

a perennial herb found in Japan, China, and Korea.
uses It is used to restore vitality in tired women; for a variety of gynecological, menstrual, and menopausal symptoms; and to treat cirrhosis of the liver. Current research suggests it is ineffective for treating menopausal symptoms, and there are insufficient data to gauge its effectiveness for other indications.
contraindications It should not be used during pregnancy, in children, or in those with known hypersensitivity. It is contraindicated in people with bleeding disorders, excessive menstrual flow, or acute illness.
A fragrant perennial herb, the root of which is analgesic, sedative, and an immune stimulant; it has been used for abscesses and sores, anaemia, arrhythmias, cancer, dysmenorrhoea, headaches, loss of appetite, menstrual dysfunction, PMS, post-traumatic and post-surgical pain, blurred vision
Toxicity Angelica should not be used in early pregnancy

an·gel·i·ca

(an-jel'i-kă)
An Asian herb (A. sinensis) that is used in many forms (dried root preparations, oils, tinctures) against various complaints; adverse reactions have been widely reported.
Synonym(s): dong quai.
[L., angelic]

dong quai (dng kwī),

n Latin name:
Angelica polymorphia var.
sinesis; part used: roots; uses: PMS, dysmenorrhea, menorrhagia, headaches, neuralgia, herpes, malaria, vitiligo, anemia; precautions; pregnancy, lactation, children; patients with breast, uterine, or ovarian cancer, bleeding conditions, inordinate periods, or acute illness, can cause nausea, bleeding, photosensitivity. Also called
Chinese angelica, dang gui, drykuei, tanggwi, tang-kuei, toki, and
women's ginseng. See also angelica.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other herbs that may be beneficial include Dong Quai (500 mg to 1000 mg two or three times daily); evening primrose oil (500mg three or four times daily); ginseng (100 mg to 500 mg three times daily); and Vitex agnus castus (175 mg daily).
Ginseng, red clover, dong quai and evening primrose oil have little or no effect.
In a recent clinical trial, however, the often-recommended dong quai was found to relieve hot flashes, insomnia, or mood swings no more effectively than a placebo.
Plus White Deadnettle and Dong Quai which help to reduce the adverse effects of PMS.
Other preparations may potentiate the action of warfarin thus increasing the risk of hemorrhage; these include dan shen, dong quai, devils claw, ginseng and Siberian ginseng.
This is why I disagree with the use of Dong Quai in an ADT study because a well-done randomized trial in women in the 1990s and a recent well-designed trial found no affect on hot flashes beyond a placebo effect, whether Dong Quai was used alone or as part of a complex multi-ingredient intervention.
Plant-based phytoestrogens--found in black cohosh, red clover, dong quai and chasteberry (vitex)--curb hot flashes and other menopausal complaints.
Researchers looked for correlations between dietary supplement usage and the incidence of breast cancer, comparing a range of products including any phytoestrogen and any isoflavone, including genistein, red clover, soy medications, black cohosh or Remifemin, Biestrogen, DHEA, Dong quai, Estrovin, ginseng, Promensil, Rejuvex, steroid creams, and yam creams.
Garlic, ginger, ginkgo biloba, feverfew (used for migraines), and the herb dong quai (for menstrual cramps) can all increase the anticoagulant effect, while ginseng can decrease it.
A clinical pharmacist in Los Angeles, Shapiro offers practitioners guidelines for integrating natural products--including vitamins, soy and whey protein supplements, fish oils, dong quai, evening primrose oil, pygeum, stinging nettle, etc.
Dong quai extract, also a hormone balancer, nourishes the reproductive organs, while parsley leaves act as a diuretic.