dominate


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dominate

(dom′ĭnāt″) [L. dominari, to master, control]
1. In behavioral health, to control, govern, or wield authority over others.
2. In health care administration or public health, to provide an option superior to others.
References in periodicals archive ?
If dominate is to have the ball and to move the ball without progression, yes, they also dominate.
Then, v(s) does not dominate w(S), thus S is an unsafe triple of S.
Although ants dominate the biomass on Earth, scientists know little about their lives and behavior, says Fisher.
Nature believes in reciprocity, so just as men want to dominate, women respond with wanting to be dominated.
Programs that encourage the poor to save are also becoming more prominent and are yet another example of the how the financialization of everyday life has affected social policy Financialization also has implications for social policy in the developing world where microcredit programs such as the Grameen Bank now dominate development thinking.
Bleach kraft pulps (BKP) dominate the market wood pulp business--a fact that is not about to change.
According to the report, men, and especially men with power, dominate the news, while the women in the news are usually victims.
THE sport's greatest ever player, Stephen Hendry, claimed modern-day players will not make the sacrifices needed to dominate the sport in the way Steve Davis and he did in the 1980s and 1990s.
For small companies and workgroups, server attached RAID will continue to be the first line of defense against hardware downtime and in this category PCI based RAID will continue to dominate.
There is no reliable estimate of which religion dominates nationally, but Muslims are in a big majority in the north and Christians dominate in the east, while the south-west is mixed.
In concentrated sectors, where a few large firms dominate the industry , women dominate the Industry, women's pay has trilled that of men to a greater extent than in more competitive sectors of the economy, but as concentrated sectors were increasingly exposed to international trade (which acted as competition), the gender wage gap narrowed.
The present study was designed to explicitly test Eagly & Johnson's (1990) incidental finding that when men dominate numerically, women leaders report a less interpersonally oriented style or, in other words, a style more like men.