dominant hemisphere


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to dominant hemisphere: cerebral dominance, left hemisphere, lateralization, right hemisphere

hemisphere

 [hem´ĭ-sfēr]
half of a spherical or roughly spherical structure or organ.
cerebral hemisphere one of the paired structures constituting the largest part of the brain, which together comprise the extensive cerebral cortex, centrum semiovale, basal ganglia, and rhinencephalon, and contain the lateral ventricle. See also brain.
cerebellar hemisphere either of the paired portions of the cerebellum lateral to the vermis.
dominant hemisphere the cerebral hemisphere that is more concerned than the other in the integration of sensations and the control of many functions. See also laterality.

dom·i·nant hem·i·sphere

that cerebral hemisphere containing the representation of speech and controlling the arm and leg used preferentially in skilled movements; usually the left hemisphere.

dominant hemisphere

Neurology That portion of the brain involved in guiding activities requiring manual dexterity; for those who are right-handed, the left hemisphere is dominant

dom·i·nant hem·i·sphere

(dom'i-nănt hem'is-fēr')
That cerebral hemisphere containing the representation of speech and controlling the arm and leg used preferentially in skilled movements; usually the left hemisphere.

dominant hemisphere

The left half of the brain in almost all right-handed people and 85% of left-handed people. This is the hemisphere concerned with language and logical thought and containing the motor areas for voluntary use of the right side of the body. In 15% of left-handed people, the right hemisphere is dominant and subserves speech.

dom·i·nant hem·i·sphere

(dom'i-nănt hem'is-fēr')
Cerebral hemisphere containing representation of speech and controlling arms and legs used preferentially in skilled movements; usually the left.
References in periodicals archive ?
These results showed that knowing an individual's preferred handedness it is not sufficient to determine their dominant hemisphere for language.
If the dominant hemisphere is involved there may be an associated speech deficit.
The concept of a dominant hemisphere may help them better understand their own individual thinking style and the way they solve problems.