dominant


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Related to dominant: dominant gene

dominant

 [dom´ĭ-nant]
1. exerting a ruling or controlling influence.
2. in genetics, capable of expression when carried by only one of a pair of homologous chromosomes; see dominant gene.
3. an allele or trait that has this characteristic.
dominant side the half of the body in which a person is stronger; writing and eating are usually done with the hand on the dominant side. See also handedness.

dom·i·nant

(dom'i-nănt),
1. Ruling or controlling.
2. In genetics, denoting an allele possessed by one of the parents of a hybrid that is expressed in the latter to the exclusion of a contrasting allele (the recessive) from the other parent.
[L. dominans, pres. p. of dominor, to rule, fr. dominus, lord, master, fr. domus, house]

dominant

/dom·i·nant/ (dom´ĭ-nant)
1. exerting a ruling or controlling influence.
2. in genetics, capable of expression when carried by only one of a pair of homologous chromosomes.
3. a dominant allele or trait.

dominant

(dŏm′ə-nənt)
adj.
1. Tending to be stronger than its counterpart or used for the most important tasks or in the most pressing situations: Which is your dominant eye? Throw the ball with your dominant arm.
2. Genetics Of, relating to, or being an allele that produces the same phenotypic effect in heterozygotes as in homozygotes.
3. Ecology Of, relating to, or being a species that is most characteristic of an ecological community and usually determines the presence, abundance, and type of other species.
n.
1. Genetics A dominant allele or a trait produced by a dominant allele.
2. Ecology A dominant species.

dom′i·nant·ly adv.

dominant

[dom′inənt]
Etymology: L, dominari, to rule
1 exerting a ruling or controlling influence.
2 in genetics, capable of expression when carried by only one of a pair of homologous chromosomes.
3 in coronary artery anatomy, supplying the posterior diaphragmatic part of the interventricular septum and the diaphragmatic surface of the left ventricle; said of the right and left coronary arteries.

dominant

Genetics
noun A phenotype expressed when a particular gene is present in a cell, regardless of whether the allelic set contains 2 different forms of expression; the allele with the masked phenotype is termed recessive.
 
Autosomal dominant disorders
Achondroplasia, familial hypercholesterolemia, Huntington’s disease.

Sexology
adjective, noun Top; Referring to the person, or the person him- or herself, who takes the active or controlling role in a BDSM relationship, which contrasts to the submissive (bottom) position or role.

dominant

Genetics A phenotype expressed when a particular gene is present in a cell, regardless of whether the allelic set contains 2 different forms of expression; the allele with the masked phenotype is termed recessive Dominant disorders Achondroplasia, familial hypercholesterolemia, Huntington's disease. See Filial generation, Homozygote, Trait. Cf Recessive.

dom·i·nant

(dom'i-nănt)
1. Ruling or controlling.
2. genetics Denoting an allele possessed by one of the parents of a hybrid that is expressed in the latter to the exclusion of a contrasting allele (the recessive) from the other parent.
[L. dominans, pres. p. of dominor, to rule, fr. dominus, lord, master, fr. domus, house]

dominant

See DOMINANCE.

dominant

1. exerting a ruling or controlling influence; in genetics, capable of expression when carried by only one of a pair of homologous chromosomes.
2. a dominant allele or trait. If a defect, appearance in all heterozygotes and homozygotes tends toward the trait being self-limiting because of culling or death. See also gene, dominance.

dominant X-linked inheritance
References in classic literature ?
It was in great pains and upheavals--that I felt in every fibre but its dominant idea, to put it coarsely, was to get back a bit of its own.
Following her caprices as a young girl, she had studied all things for a time, and then abandoned them,--taking up and leaving each train of thought at will, until, at last, painting had proved to be her dominant passion.
These were well preserved and unchanging; one and all they are the same: cold, selfish, dominant, reckless of consequences in pursuit of their own will.
The dominant figure, both because he was bigger in all three dimensions, and because he sat centrally in the length of the table, facing me, was a tall, fat man dressed completely in black, with a rubicund, even apoplectic visage, but a rather bald and rather bothered brow.
Tenderness was absolutely dominant in Clare at last.
Sillerton Jackson and his sister Sophy (who went wherever her brother told her to), were some of the most fashionable and yet most irreproachable of the dominant "young married" set; the Lawrence Leffertses, Mrs.
All were of the highly civilized and cultured race of red men who are dominant on Mars.
The ancient chronicles of the first historians of Barsoom--so ancient that we have for ages considered them mythology--record the passing of the yellow men from the ravages of the green hordes that overran Barsoom as the drying up of the great oceans drove the dominant races from their strongholds.
I carried a clear picture of his unkempt hair, his unbrushed coat, his dominant spectacles, his dogmatic jaw.
It was a presentiment that human thought, in changing its form, was about to change its mode of expression; that the dominant idea of each generation would no longer be written with the same matter, and in the same manner; that the book of stone, so solid and so durable, was about to make way for the book of paper, more solid and still more durable.
High up among the branches of a mighty tree she hugged the shrieking infant to her bosom, and soon the instinct that was as dominant in this fierce female as it had been in the breast of his tender and beautiful mother--the instinct of mother love--reached out to the tiny man-child's half-formed understanding, and he became quiet.
Porthos, whose dominant fault was not sensibility, groaned at this.