domesticate

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domesticate

(də-mĕs′tĭ-kāt′)
tr.v. domesti·cated, domesti·cating, domesti·cates
a. To train or adapt (an animal or plant) to live in a human environment and be of use to humans.
b. To introduce and accustom (an animal or plant) into another region; naturalize.
n. (-kət, -kāt′)
A plant or animal that has been adapted to live in a human environment.

do·mes′ti·ca′tion n.
References in periodicals archive ?
At least two independent domestication events have been postulated based on this disjunct occurrence in India.
The results from this study will contribute to an international effort using a variety of genetic techniques to analyze ancient dogs and wolves to better understand the origins of canine domestication.
Although Qabrestan is far from Eastern Anatolia and Central Zagros where the most evidence of goat domestication and herding exist (e.
This adaptation to carb-rich diets is also found in human evolutionary history, underscoring how dog domestication mirrors our own development.
They provide a description of the domestication and barriers to domestication associated with development of lupin as a crop plant.
To look for genetic variants associated with domestication, the researchers examined DNA from 22 cats from six domestic breeds (Felis silvestris catus), two European wildcats (F.
Chapter 2 deals with the processes, places, and anatomical and genetic outcomes of domestication for seed crops, weedy races, vegetatively propagated plants, and, briefly (three pages), animals.
A group of traits common among domesticated animals may arise when some wandering embryonic cells lose their way, a new theory of domestication proposes.
The cultivation, domestication and intensive exploitation of the vine and the olive transformed the agricultural, economic and social history of Europe.
Based on archaeological evidence, it had long been thought that horse domestication originated in the western part of the Eurasian Steppe (Ukraine, southwest Russia and west Kazakhstan); however, a single origin in a geographically restricted area appeared at odds with the large number of female lineages in the domestic horse gene pool, commonly thought to reflect multiple domestication "events" across a wide geographic area.
Arguably one of the most important developments in human history, the domestication of animals transformed societies that adopted the practice.
By calli ng the suite of photographs "Domestic," Opie seems to suggest that at issue is both a sense of being at home and a certain domestication or taming.