domesticate

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domesticate

(də-mĕs′tĭ-kāt′)
tr.v. domesti·cated, domesti·cating, domesti·cates
a. To train or adapt (an animal or plant) to live in a human environment and be of use to humans.
b. To introduce and accustom (an animal or plant) into another region; naturalize.
n. (-kət, -kāt′)
A plant or animal that has been adapted to live in a human environment.

do·mes′ti·ca′tion n.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, aquaculture has begun to raise concerns, especially with regard to practices involving carnivorous species that are higher on the food chain and cannot be fully domesticated.
All of the following factors have been identified as risk factors for the emergence of zoonotic diseases: international travel; global trade; increasing interactions among humans, wildlife, and exotic and domesticated food and companion animals; human behavior; rapid microbial adaptation; changing climates and ecosystems; and changing livestock management methods (10).
The leaves are collected as fodder for domesticated animals while the bark is used to flavour sel roft and as a red dye.
Thailand has about 2,000-2,500 domesticated Asian elephants.
The purpose of this paper is to document the concentrations of mineral and organic substances in the milk of domesticated taiga moose during lactation.
A Thai official in charge of CITES matters said Thailand allows only domesticated elephants to be exported, not wild ones, and for a maximum of one year.
parent cannot use the foreign corporation's NOL carryovers when it is domesticated in the U.
The giant tiger is the dominant prawn species farmed in Asia and Australia, but progress in producing domesticated stocks on a commercial scale has been slow.
He says the domesticated llamas, alpacas, turkeys, and dogs of America could not pull it off either.
Of some 200,1500 species of plants known to us, only a few thousand are eaten by humans, and of these just a few hundred have been domesticated in any way.
Since we humans have made domesticated animals dependent upon us for survival, it is now our obligation to care for all of them kindly and well--a goal far from being realized.
Of the large terrestrial, herbivorous or omnivorous mammals, Eurasia had 72 species of which 13 were domesticated, sub-Saharan Africa had 51 of which none were domesticated, the Americas had 24 of which one (the llama) was domesticated, and Australia had one (the red kangaroo) which was not domesticated.