domain


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do·main

(dō-mān'),
1. Homologous unit of approximately 110-120 amino acids, groups of which make up the light and heavy chains of the immunoglobulin molecule; each serves a specific function. The light chain has two domains, one in the variable region and one in the constant region of the chain; the heavy chain has four to five domains, depending on the class of immunoglobulin, one in the variable region and the remaining ones in the constant region.
2. A region of a protein having some distinctive physical feature or role.
3. An independently folded, globular structure composed of one section of a polypeptide chain. A domain may interact with another domain; it may be associated with a particular function. Domains can vary in size.
[Fr. domaine, fr. L. dominium, property, dominion]

domain

/do·main/ (do-mān´) in immunology, any of the homology regions of heavy or light polypeptide chains of immunoglobulins.

domain

(dō-mān′)
n.
Biology Any of three primary divisions of organisms, consisting of the eukaryotes, bacteria, and archaea, that rank above a kingdom in taxonomic systems based on similarities of DNA sequences.

domain

a region of a protein or polypeptide whose three-dimensional configuration enables it to interact specifically with particular receptors, enzymes, or other proteins.

domain

EBM
Any of a collection of observations with a topic-specific commonality about each subject in a clinical trial, which the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) divides into different classes:
• Interventions class;
• Events class;
• Findings class.

do·main

(dō-mān')
1. Homologous unit of 110-120 amino acids, groups of which make up the light and heavy chains of the immunoglobulin molecule; each serves a specific function. The light chain has two domains, one in the variable region and one in the constant region of the chain; the heavy chain has four to five domains, depending on the class of immunoglobulin, one in the variable region and the remaining ones in the constant region.
2. A region of a protein having some distinctive physical feature or role.
3. An independently folded, globular structure composed of one section of a polypeptide chain. A domain may interact with another domain; it may be associated with a particular function. Domains can vary in size.
[Fr. domaine, fr. L. dominium, property, dominion]

domain

1. Of a protein, a discrete length of the amino acid sequence that is known to be associated with a specific function.
2. Of a chromosome, a region in which supercoiling occurs independently of other domains; or a region that includes a gene of raised sensitivity to degradation by DNASE I.

domain

  1. a structurally or functionally distinct part of a PROTEIN.
  2. any of three primary groupings (‘superkingdoms’): ARCHAEA, BACTERIA or EUCARYA, into which all ORGANISMS are placed in modern CLASSIFICATIONS based on genetic structures and sequences.

domain

1. region of a protein with a characteristic tertiary structure and function; homologous domains may occur on different proteins.
2. regions of the heavy chain of immunoglobulins. See cH domain, cL domain.

transmembrane domain
for any membrane-bound protein or glycoprotein, those amino acid sequences that traverse and are present in the cell membrane. In receptor biology, transmembrane domains are distinguished from the extracellular ligand binding domains, cytoplasmic domains, and from immunological domains.

Patient discussion about domain

Q. What other illnesses are similar to asthma? I am 45 years old. My doctor suspects I might have adult asthma but there has yet been a final diagnosis made. What other problems might this be?

A. Before diagnosing someone as asthmatic, alternative possibilities should be considered. A clinician taking a history should check whether the patient is using any known bronchoconstrictors (substances that cause narrowing of the airways, e.g., certain anti-inflammatory agents or beta-blockers). Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which closely resembles asthma, is correlated with more exposure to cigarette smoke, an older patient, and decreased likelihood of family history of atopy. Your physician should examine these possibilities as well before diagnosing.

More discussions about domain
References in classic literature ?
His title of Captain of the Kaolian Road explained his timely presence in the heart of the savage forest, for every highway upon Barsoom is patrolled by doughty warriors of the noble class, nor is there any service more honorable than this lonely and dangerous duty in the less frequented sections of the domains of the red men of Barsoom.
The domain of Bracieux, chateaux, forests, plowed lands, forming three farms.
For they had no doubt at all that they would be able to destroy Ozma's domain.
The Luanians had not, of course, been ignorant of all that had been going on in the domains of their nearest and dearest enemies.
For instance, I was a city boy, a city child, rather, to whom the country was an unexplored domain.
The master's domain was wide and complex, yet it had its metes and bounds.
Then a Stag intruded into his domain and shared his pasture.
She could not recall a line of them, for Jove had decreed that the memory of them abide in Pluto's painful domain, as a part of the apparatus.
Here are no heights of truth overlooking the confused landscape of that dubitable domain.
Perkins, who knew nothing of the little drama of emotions that went on under the routine of lessons and exercises in his domain, was purely accidental, but we took it at the time as a stroke of diabolical genius.
A lion reigned, undisturbed, within a few miles of the seat of one of the greatest governments the world has ever known, his domain a howling wilderness, where yesterday fell the shadows of the largest city in the world.
You're encroaching on Princess Myakaya's special domain now.