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Related to doctrine: Military doctrine


A particular system of principles taught or advocated.
[L. doceo, to teach]
A theory or posit widely accepted by leading authorities in a particular field


A theory or posit widely accepted by leading authorities in a particular field. See Assumption-of-risk doctrine, Borrowed servant doctrine, Captain-of-the-ship doctrine, De minimus doctrine, Emergency doctrine, Feres doctrine, Humoral doctrine, Hypothesis, Lost-opportunity doctrine, Posit, Therapeutic privilege.


(dok'trin) [Fr. doctrine, fr L. doctrina, teaching]
A system of principles taught or advocated.

borrowed servant doctrine

The legal doctrine, a form of vicarious liability, that a patient care supervisor (e.g., an attending physician who oversees the work of a resident physician) may be held responsible for the negligent acts of a subordinate. See: Captain of the Ship doctrine ; vicarious liability

Captain of the Ship doctrine

The legal doctrine, a form of vicarious liability, that the legal responsibility for errors in a medical setting falls on the most highly trained or senior health care provider present at the time. This doctrine has been used to hold attending physicians or surgeons responsible for the negligent acts of the surgical or anesthesia team. See: borrowed servant doctrine; vicarious liability

learned intermediary doctrine

The legal doctrine that a pharmaceutical manufacturer need only advise or warn physicians, and not the public at large, of the potential hazards of the drugs it produces. Under this doctrine physicians act as agents for the public when they prescribe medications. Their education and clinical experience help them decide when to use a medication and when, because of safety concerns, to avoid its use. Exceptions to the doctrine are illustrated by direct-to-consumer drug advertising (e.g., on television or the Internet) in which pharmaceutical companies present their products directly to patients without the physician acting as intermediary. Synonym: learned intermediary rule
References in classic literature ?
You have no warranty for such an audacious doctrine, nor any covenant to support it," cried David who was deeply tinctured with the subtle distinctions which, in his time , and more especially in his province, had been drawn around the beautiful simplicity of revelation, by endeavoring to penetrate the awful mystery of the divine nature, supplying faith by self-sufficiency, and by consequence, involving those who reasoned from such human dogmas in absurdities and doubt; "your temple is reared on the sands, and the first tempest will wash away its foundation.
The whole substance of human authority was centred in the simple doctrine of royal prerogative, the origin of which was always traced in theory to divine institution.
Theoretically, this doctrine is unquestionable; but it has practical drawbacks.
I've heard a deal o' doctrine i' my time, for I used to go after the Dissenting preachers along wi' Seth, when I was a lad o' seventeen, and got puzzling myself a deal about th' Arminians and the Calvinists.
Doctrine it was necessary to preach, for nothing less would have satisfied the disputatious people who were his listeners, and who would have interpreted silence on his part into a tacit acknowledgment of the superficial nature of his creed.
Monsieur," said Conrart, "you yourself are in the wrong persisting in decorating yourself with the name of an Epicurean; indeed, nothing here reminds me of the doctrine of the philosopher of Gargetta.
It was gravely said by some of the prelates in the Council of Trent, where the doctrine of the Schoolmen bare great sway, that the Schoolmen were like astronomers, which did feign eccentrics and epicycles, and such engines of orbs, to save the phenomena; though they knew there were no such things; and in like manner, that the Schoolmen had framed a number of subtle and intricate axioms, and theorems, to save the practice of the church.
You don't believe that you ought to preach my doctrine, and, therefore, do no despite to your conscience in abstaining.
But despite their endeavors to prove that the cause of events lies in intellectual activity, only by a great stretch can one admit that there is any connection between intellectual activity and the movement of peoples, and in no case can one admit that intellectual activity controls people's actions, for that view is not confirmed by such facts as the very cruel murders of the French Revolution resulting from the doctrine of the equality of man, or the very cruel wars and executions resulting from the preaching of love.
I did hear him preach, and was decidedly pleased with the evangelical truth of his doctrine, as well as the earnest simplicity of his manner, and the clearness and force of his style.
The doctrine, or belief, that everything is beautiful,
If, therefore, this new doctrine contains something more certain, it seems justly to deserve to be followed.