doctor shopping


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Psychiatry The visiting of multiple physicians, each time with a new symptom
Substance abuse The seeking of doctors who will prescribe opioids and opiates

doctor shopping

Psychiatry The visiting of multiple physicians, each time with a new symptom Substance abuse The seeking of doctors who will prescribe opioids and opiates. See Drug-seeking behavior.

doc·tor shop·ping

(dok'tŏr shop'ing)
A practice in which patients go from one health care professional to one or more others so as to procure the diagnosis or therapy desired, rather than required, in the opinion of the first physician.

doctor shopping

A colloquial term for the unethical and illegal practice of seeking care from multiple health care providers for an illicit purpose (often, but not solely, to obtain prescriptions for controlled substances).
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47 percent decrease in the average monthly doctor shopping alerts when comparing 2017 data to 2015 data.
A PDMP, a technological approach to tracking controlled substance prescriptions, is a critical tool to help identify individuals who may be " doctor shopping, " or seeking to gain access to more opioids by visiting multiple prescribers who could be unaware of other prescriptions that have been obtained and filled.
A state's PDMP can reveal whether patients may be obtaining multiple controlled substance prescriptions from different doctors or doctor shopping, Ms.
Almost all states now have prescription registries to help detect doctor shopping, multiple prescribers, and misdirection.
Approximately 500,000 people nationwide engage in doctor shopping every year.
Such databases have made it more difficult for individuals to go doctor shopping for prescription medication, but research is still ongoing as to what type of impact PDMPs are having on reducing opioid overdose deaths and improving interventions.
Social###Fear of stigma###Fear of doctor shopping ; multiple responsibilities###Lack of social discreteness ; cost
Such monitoring programs help providers to identify so-called doctor shopping, prevent drug diversion and pinpoint patterns of abuse.
PDMPs are effective in improving quality of care and reducing doctor shopping, diversion and prescription fraud.
If a person is caught doctor shopping, they can be charged and face penalties that range from up to a five-year sentence in prison, felony conviction, and a fine of up to $5,000.
Only when the problem is beyond their capability will they refer a patient to a specialist, thus sparing the patient from doctor shopping and being made to undergo expensive (and often unnecessary) laboratory tests.
5, on how the program is being used to prevent pill mills, doctor shopping and other signs of potential drug abuse.