doctor shopping


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Psychiatry The visiting of multiple physicians, each time with a new symptom
Substance abuse The seeking of doctors who will prescribe opioids and opiates

doctor shopping

Psychiatry The visiting of multiple physicians, each time with a new symptom Substance abuse The seeking of doctors who will prescribe opioids and opiates. See Drug-seeking behavior.

doc·tor shop·ping

(dok'tŏr shop'ing)
A practice in which patients go from one health care professional to one or more others so as to procure the diagnosis or therapy desired, rather than required, in the opinion of the first physician.

doctor shopping

A colloquial term for the unethical and illegal practice of seeking care from multiple health care providers for an illicit purpose (often, but not solely, to obtain prescriptions for controlled substances).
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July 28, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Kentucky's dramatic decline in prescription drug abuse and doctor shopping after a 2012 law required providers to check a state database before prescribing powerful and addictive medications is yet more evidence that Californians need the same protections, Consumer Watchdog said today.
Mandated or not, use of PMPs can curtail doctor shopping, which is why pressure has mounted on Missouri to establish a program.
5, on how the program is being used to prevent pill mills, doctor shopping and other signs of potential drug abuse.
The Senate Bill takes various actions, including but not limited to, enhanced regulation to prevent doctor shopping and increase accountability for those prescribing and dispensing prescription drugs.
The highlighting of so-called doctor shopping now needs to be "formalised," they added.
Doctor Shopping Law: Does the state have a doctor shopping statute?
The article on doctor shopping for Tramadol in Issue 542 of TheWeek brought to light a danA[degrees] gerous habit.
a doctor that sells prescription), doctor shopping (i.
In 2009, GAO reported on doctor shopping in Medicaid, where individuals see several doctors and pharmacies, receiving more of a drug than was intended by any single physician.
The other strategies include education of health care providers, patients, parents and youth; establishing prescription drug monitoring programs in all the states; and increased enforcement to address doctor shopping and pill mills.
The statute also establishes a PPO-like network of providers for workers' compensation claims, a provision that advocates say will cut back on doctor shopping among lawyers looking for providers that will approve more expensive treatments.
The action plan provides a national framework for reducing prescription drug diversion and abuse by supporting the expansion of state-based prescription drug monitoring programs, recommending more convenient and environmentally responsible disposal methods to remove unused medications from the home, supporting education for patients and healthcare providers, and reducing the prevalence of pill mills and doctor shopping through enforcement efforts.