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Lavinia Lloyd (1858–1956). American pioneer in public health nursing. Beginning with her work with the United Workers of Norwich, Connecticut, she made valuable contributions to public health nursing, including work with Lillian wald at the Henry Street Settlement in New York. In addition, she was active in the women's suffrage movement and an advocate of legislative control of nursing practice. She was also a prolific author; her works include Materia Medica for Nurses, one of the earliest nursing textbooks, and a four-volume History of Nursing, written with Adelaide nutting.
 Lavinia Lloyd Dock. Special collections, Milbank Memorial Library, Teachers College, Columbia University.


1. The solid or fleshy part of an animal's tail.
2. The tail of an animal after it has been bobbed or clipped.
tr.v. docked, docking, docks
To clip short or cut off (an animal's tail, for example).

Dock, Lavinia Lloyd

an American public health nurse. A graduate of the Bellevue Hospital Training School for Nurses in New York in 1886, she started a visiting nurse service in Norwalk, Connecticut. She then joined the New York City Mission before becoming an assistant to Isabel Hampton Robb at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. She returned to public health nursing when she joined the Henry Street Settlement in New York to work with Lillian Wald. She advocated an international public health movement and the improvement of education for nurses. With M. Adelaide Nutting, she wrote History of Nursing, a classic in nursing literature.
References in classic literature ?
At the same time that his agents were purchasing corner lots and entire blocks in the heart of the business section and the waste lands for factory sites, Day was rushing franchises through the city council, capturing the two exhausted water companies and the eight or nine independent street railways, and getting his grip on the Oakland Creek and the bay tide-lands for his dock system.
Katherine's Dock House on Tower Hill, and he informed us that he had a special affection for the view of that historic locality, with the Gardens to the left, the front of the Mint to the right, the miserable tumble-down little houses farther away, a cabstand, boot- blacks squatting on the edge of the pavement and a pair of big policemen gazing with an air of superiority at the doors of the Black Horse public-house across the road.
Presently, the dock became the central point of interest.
Its wires are waiting at the dock and the depot, so that a tourist may sit in his stateroom and talk with a friend in some distant office.
Ah, here was a splendid means of escape, for it let directly upon the dock, not twenty feet from the water's edge.
Slipping the key into the pocket of his tunic and covering the bundle with his long surcoat, De Vac stepped out into the darkness of the alley and hastened toward the dock.
You will find yourself in the dock, my friend, in the prisoners' dock, I say
Captain Granet, Ralph promised that there should be a pinnace at number seven dock from one until three.
Already a small group of the happy shore-staying folk had clustered on the dock.
Some laborers, unloading a scow at a dock at the river, paused for a moment and regarded the fight.
And yet the prosecution has not hesitated to put into the prisoner's dock a man who is respected, esteemed, and loved by all who knew him--a young savant, the hope of French science, whose whole life has been devoted to knowledge and truth.
If you interfere to balk his vengeance, you should remember there is one way to shut your testimony out; and that is to put you in the dock.