diving


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diving

the act of work or recreation in an underwater environment. The main health effects are related to the increased pressure to which the person is subjected as the ambient pressure generally increases by 1 atm (14.7 pounds per square inch) for each 33 feet of descent below the water surface. Conditions that warrant caution about diving include obesity, diabetes, alcoholism, epilepsy, drug abuse, and respiratory disorders, including allergic rhinitis. See also decompression sickness, diving reflex.

diving

(1) diving in swimming pools carries the potential hazard of neck injury, if the dive is too steep relative to the depth of the water; (2) in scuba diving the diver breathes compressed air from a cylinder, through a face mask and a closed system of tubes ('self-contained underwater breathing apparatus'). Pressure increases by 1 atmosphere (1 bar) per 10 metres of depth. Below 30 m the 'intoxicating' effect of nitrogen narcosis is a danger, avoided by the use of helium-oxygen mixtures. Hypothermia is also a hazard in cold climates; (3) in breath-hold diving the duration of immersion can be increased if the dive is preceded by vigorous hyperventilation. This depletes carbon dioxide in the body so that it will take longer to rise to the level which would normally trigger the break-point, but oxygen in the lungs and the blood can be depleted to the point of threatening consciousness. See also barotrauma, cervical spine, decompression illness.

diving

the act of submerging underwater; diving by fish and amphibians creates an obvious need for mechanisms that allow them to be submerged under water for long periods. Most mammalian and avian orders also have aquatic species that have a similar need. Diving reflexes operate as soon as nostrils are submerged and include oxygen conservation, respiratory arrest, intense peripheral vasoconstriction, bradycardia and compression of the chest with almost complete evacuation of the lungs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Also, free diving is an international competitive sport whereas scuba diving is not.
An Approved Cover Holder at Lloyd's, they provide various types of scuba diving insurance, including dive equipment, pro divers, sport divers, and underwater film and media.
It's a wonderful opportunity to highlight the beauty of Aqaba's underwater riches, and the amazing topography which lends itself to technical diving.
The Bangor pool is currently operating diving lesson schemes and the display is open to the public.
Non-divers can participate in the Discover Scuba Diving course.
It requires all members of the team to be versed on diving procedures, maintenance, administration, applicable diving instructions and policies.
The Professional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI) has developed dive education programmes specifically for children aged 8-12 years which are conducted in the confined waters of a swimming pool and allow youngsters to experience the thrill of diving safely, participating in a variety of activities such as diving at night and taking photographs underwater, all under direct professional instruction.
Last year's NEC Dive Show attracted more than 16,000 divers in search of UK and overseas dive trips, new kit, the latest equipment and training opportunities, or simply a great day out catching up with diving friends.
The researchers used detailed questionnaires to ask occupational and sport divers about the number and duration of dives they made in ocean, coastal, and freshwater areas; whether a known pollution source was nearby; the type of diving mask worn (which affects the amount of water swallowed); and the amount of water typically swallowed per dive.
While diving on USS Monitor in 1998 to recover its propeller, another diver and I found ourselves surrounded by 30 overly curious and overly large barracudas.
It called for the QB to move down the line, reading the defensive end as he came down on the diving right halfback.