distraction

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distraction

 [dĭ-strak´shun]
1. diversion of attention.
2. separation of joint surfaces without rupture of their binding ligaments and without displacement.
3. surgical separation of the two parts of a bone after it is transected.
4. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as purposeful focusing of attention away from undesirable sensations.

dis·trac·tion

(dis-trak'shŭn),
1. Difficulty or impossibility of concentration or fixation of the mind.
2. A force applied to a body part to separate bony fragments or joint surfaces.
[L. dis-traho, pp. -tractus, to pull in different directions]

distraction

/dis·trac·tion/ (dis-trak´shun)
1. diversion of attention.
2. separation of joint surfaces without rupture of their binding ligaments and without displacement.
3. surgical separation of the two parts of a bone after the bone is transected.

distraction1

[distrak′shən]
Etymology: L, dis + trahere, to draw apart
1 a procedure that prevents or lessens the perception of pain by focusing attention on sensations unrelated to pain.
2 a method of straightening a spinal column by the forces of axial tension pulling on the joint surfaces, such as applied by a Milwaukee brace.

distraction2

a nursing intervention from the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) defined as purposeful focusing of attention away from undesirable sensations. See also Nursing Interventions Classification.

distraction

Pain management A pain relief method that takes attention away from the pain. See Attentional distraction.

dis·trac·tion

(dis-trak'shŭn)
1. Difficulty or impossibility of concentration or fixation of the mind.
2. Manipulation or traction of a limb to separate bony fragments or joint surfaces.
[L. dis-traho, pp. -tractus, to pull in different directions]

distraction

A pulling apart.

distraction

a display by animals, generally in response to a predator that threatens eggs or young. For example, feigning injury, behaviour directed at a predator with the aim (often effective) of diverting attention.

dis·trac·tion

(dis-trak'shŭn)
1. Difficulty or impossibility of concentration or fixation of the mind.
2. A force applied to a body part to separate bony fragments or joint surfaces.
[L. dis-traho, pp. -tractus, to pull in different directions]

distraction,

n the placement of teeth or other maxillary or mandibular structures farther than normal from the median plane.
distraction osteogenesis (DO)
(distrak´shən os´tēəjen´isis),
n a surgical process in which two bony segments are gradually separated so new soft tissue and bone will form between them. There are three periods to this process: latency, distraction, and consolidation.

distraction

1. diversion of attention.
2. separation of joint surfaces without rupture of their binding ligaments and without displacement.
3. surgical separation of the two parts of a bone after it is transected.

distraction index
a measure of hip laxity in which the degree of subluxation demonstrated radiographically when some stress is applied to the femurs is assessed as an indicator of hip dysplasia in dogs.
distraction osteogenesis
the development of new bone growth in an area subjected to gradual tension stress by the deliberate separation of fragments by traction.

Patient discussion about distraction

Q. I have a 19 year old daughter who is very distractible and is diagnosed with ADHD. I have a 19 year old daughter who is very distractible and is diagnosed with ADHD. She has a brilliant mind but she cannot finish any of her work. While doing her homework she gets distracted by the light coming from the other room and even during exams she often drifts and leaves sections undone. I know it’s very difficult for her to concentrate on one part of the work. What should she do? Please tell if you have tried.

A. Some medicines are there which can be taken on doctor’s advice. Apart from that you can also explain her to put her problem to the one she is talking, before she gets distracted. Tell her to maintain her eye contact while talking to any one so though she can remain focused. Train her by showing some signal about her distraction. Let her explain about this signal based indication whenever she gets distracted to all her friends so though she can remain with her attention. Tell her to sit close to the lecturer whenever in a class to avoid any distractions. Help her develop a habit to note down whatever thoughts or important information she gets and before she forgets.

More discussions about distraction