divergency

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divergency

(dĭ-vûr′jən-sē)
n. pl. divergen·cies
1. The state of being divergent.
2. A divergence or deviation.
References in periodicals archive ?
There were also divergencies of view on the correct allowance to be made for future premiums, whether expenses should be related to market- or entity-specific levels, and whether liabilities should be subject to a surrender value floor.
There will always be divergencies of opinion but there
The second deals with the divergencies that have developed in the Christian churches.
Further research is required before it can be determined whether the current divergencies from the NIESR framework observed in the other models represent genuine differences in approach or differences in detailed specification that can be empirically resolved.
The major divergencies which emerged suggested to some observers that where national security was concerned, the US, rather than Europe, was the preferred partner for some of these new members, e.
So, on the basis of the agreement already reached on many aspects, the Catholic Church intends to contribute towards overcoming the divergencies that still exist by suggesting, below, in order of importance, a list of points that constitute still an obstacle to agreement .
It is, nevertheless, true that Badaga presents many divergencies from Ka.
In the face of these divergencies in preferences and production, harmonisation on any basis is bound to advantage some producers and disadvantage others, and the attempt to secure agreement runs into major political difficulties.
But the thesis is given some space in Robert Kagan's book Paradise and Power in which he attempts to assess the reasons for divergencies in US/European relations which came to light most vividly in the run-up to the Iraq war.
If, moreover, it is true that in those truths on which a consensus has been reached the condemnations of the council of Trent no longer apply, the divergencies on other points must, on the contrary, be overcome before we can affirm .
Kubo first sets out the personalities and history of each movement, succinctly situating each in its larger social context, then describes practice and belief, and, in conclusion, summarizes their most important similarities and divergencies.