divergence

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divergence

 [di-ver´jens]
a moving apart, or inclination away from a common point. adj., adj divergent.

di·ver·gence

(dī-vĕr'jens),
1. A moving or spreading apart or in different directions.
2. The spreading of branches of the neuron to form synapses with several other neurons.
[L. di-, apart, + vergo, to incline]

divergence

/di·ver·gence/ (di-ver´jens) a moving apart, or inclination away from a common point.diver´gent

divergence

(dĭ-vûr′jəns, dī-)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of diverging.
b. The state of being divergent.
c. The degree by which things diverge.
2. A departure from a norm; a deviation.
3. Biology The evolutionary tendency or process by which animals or plants that are descended from a common ancestor evolve into different forms when living under different conditions.
4. Physiology A turning of both eyes outward from a common point or of one eye when the other is fixed.

divergence

[divur′jəns]
Etymology: L, di + vergere, to incline
a separation or movement of objects away from each other, as in the simultaneous turning of the eyes outward as a result of an extraocular muscle defect.

di·ver·gence

(di-vĕr'jĕns)
1. A moving or spreading apart or in different directions.
2. The spreading of branches of the neuron to form synapses with several other neurons.
[L. di-, apart, + vergo, to incline]

divergence

1. The act or state of moving off in different directions from a point.
2. The departure from each other of two processes, modes of action or courses of evolution.
3. In genetics, the degree, usually expressed as a percentage, to which two related DNA lengths differ in nucleotide sequences, or two similar proteins differ in amino acid sequence.

divergence

1. Movement of the eyes turning away from each other. 2. Characteristic of a pencil of light rays, as when emanating from a point source. Syn. negative convergence. See vergence.
divergence excess A high exophoria at distance associated with a much lower exophoria at near. It may occasionally give rise to diplopia in distance vision.
fusional divergence A movement of the eyes away from each other in response to retinal disparity, in order to restore single binocular vision. It occurs most commonly when induced by a base-in prism.
divergence insufficiency A high esophoria at distance associated with esophoria at near. It often gives rise to symptoms of asthenopia in both distance and near vision.
divergence paralysis See divergence paralysis.
vertical divergence Relative vertical movement between the two eyes.

divergence

a moving apart, or inclination away from a common point.
References in periodicals archive ?
com/, recognized Diverge at an awards banquet February 28 in Dallas for its entry titled "Boundless Digital Identity Campaign.
Commenting on this study, Brett Trauthen, chief scientific officer and vice president of clinical research, said: "We have recruited an exceptional group of interventional cardiologists to participate in the DIVERGE trial.
The government-directed, Manhattan Project-style program diverges from the historic pattern of technological breakthroughs.
In World on Fire (Doubleday), Amy Chua, professor of law at Yale, diverges from the apostles of globalization, who reaffirm that exporting the free market model will increase peace and prosperity around the world.
Thus, despite common training programs and audit decision tools, it appears EDP auditors' strategic outlook diverges from that of financial auditors.
Miracles" made the central reason for this quite clear: Edmondson's uniquely minimal style of stone carving diverges radically from the painterly, expressionistic, more-is-more sensibility typically associated, for better or for worse, with the work of the artists who inhabit this particular cultural margin - J.
387), I puzzled over the statement that "domestication diverges from a standard model of evolution.
Because domestication diverges from a standard model of evolution, he says, further experiments are necessary to add weight to Fondon and Garner's theory.