disuse syndrome

disuse syndrome

 [dis-ūs´]
deterioration of body systems as a result of prescribed or unavoidable inactivity. See also hazards of immobility.
risk for disuse syndrome a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a state in which an individual is at risk for deterioration of body systems owing to prescribed or unavoidable musculoskeletal inactivity.

disuse syndrome,

in nursing, a term that encompasses similar concepts and includes nursing diagnoses related to inactivity. Risks for disuse syndrome include impaired skin integrity, constipation, altered respiratory function, altered peripheral tissue perfusion, activity intolerance, impaired physical mobility, injury, altered sensory perception, powerlessness, and body image disturbance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Disuse syndrome, first described in 1984 by Bortz involves effects of sedentary life on physical and human psyche, being responsible for altering health as well.
Keywords: lumbar disk hernia, sustained loading of the spine, disuse syndrome, patient activism implementation
In principle, disuse syndrome involves sedentary effects on human physique and psyche.
The disuse syndrome group included patients with rheumatoid arthritis, muscle injury, respiratory disease, gastrointestinal disease, cardiac disease, neuromuscular disease, or other conditions.
Disuse syndrome is a type of hypoactivity with musculoskeletal inactivity, which results in depletion of body systems and is typically associated with mechanical or prescribed immobilization, severe pain, and/or an altered level of consciousness [20].
There was no significant difference in mean age among the groups of disuse syndrome patients (mean age = 79.
Impaired physical mobility, immobility, and disuse syndrome are terms that are sometimes used to describe deconditioning.
The risk of fracture was significantly increased in PD relative to the control group, and hip fractures can cause disuse syndrome, impairment of ADL and poor quality of life (QOL).
The aims of exercise are 1) training for primary symptoms such as rigidity, bradykinesia, balance impairment and gait disturbance; and 2) training for secondary disuse syndrome, such as muscle weakness, range of motion restriction, low strength, and cardiopulmonary insufficiency, due to inactivity caused by primary symptoms.
These were subsequently aggregated into the Disuse Syndrome the components of which are (a) cardiovascular vulnerability, (b) musculoskeletal fragility, (c) metabolic instability, (d) immunologic susceptibility, (e) CNS compromise, and (f) precocious aging, frailty (4).
Several decades of intensive inquiry abetted by expansive technological effort, however, have yielded little insight into a genetic base for aging and disuse and the other components of the Disuse Syndrome.
The converse of the anabolic potential of symmorphosis is the Disuse Syndrome in which linked catabolism is noted in a variety of settings.