disuse syndrome

disuse syndrome

 [dis-ūs´]
deterioration of body systems as a result of prescribed or unavoidable inactivity. See also hazards of immobility.
risk for disuse syndrome a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a state in which an individual is at risk for deterioration of body systems owing to prescribed or unavoidable musculoskeletal inactivity.

disuse syndrome,

in nursing, a term that encompasses similar concepts and includes nursing diagnoses related to inactivity. Risks for disuse syndrome include impaired skin integrity, constipation, altered respiratory function, altered peripheral tissue perfusion, activity intolerance, impaired physical mobility, injury, altered sensory perception, powerlessness, and body image disturbance.
References in periodicals archive ?
The disuse syndrome group included patients with rheumatoid arthritis, muscle injury, respiratory disease, gastrointestinal disease, cardiac disease, neuromuscular disease, or other conditions.
Disuse syndrome is a type of hypoactivity with musculoskeletal inactivity, which results in depletion of body systems and is typically associated with mechanical or prescribed immobilization, severe pain, and/or an altered level of consciousness [20].
There was no significant difference in mean age among the groups of disuse syndrome patients (mean age = 79.
A previous history of disability was correlated with age and sex among orthopedic patients, while such a correlation was not observed among stroke and disuse syndrome patients.
In disuse syndrome patients in Table 5, age, sex, previous history of disability and FIM score at the beginning of therapy, which were included in step 1 of the model, explained a significant portion of the variance (p < 0.
Among disuse syndrome patients, an interaction between effectiveness of therapy and discharge destination did not explain a significant portion of the variance (Table 5).
Second, although the intensity of therapy was correlated with FIM scores at the beginning of therapy among orthopedic patients, such correlation was not observed among stroke and disuse syndrome patients.
Impaired physical mobility, immobility, and disuse syndrome are terms that are sometimes used to describe deconditioning.
These were subsequently aggregated into the Disuse Syndrome the components of which are (a) cardiovascular vulnerability, (b) musculoskeletal fragility, (c) metabolic instability, (d) immunologic susceptibility, (e) CNS compromise, and (f) precocious aging, frailty (4).
Several decades of intensive inquiry abetted by expansive technological effort, however, have yielded little insight into a genetic base for aging and disuse and the other components of the Disuse Syndrome.
The converse of the anabolic potential of symmorphosis is the Disuse Syndrome in which linked catabolism is noted in a variety of settings.
An analogy to the energetic premise of the Disuse Syndrome is the General Adaptation Syndrome proposed by Selye 60 years ago (31).