disuse atrophy


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Related to disuse atrophy: hypertrophy

atrophy

 [at´ro-fe]
1. decrease in size of a normally developed organ or tissue; see also wasting.
2. to undergo or cause such a decrease. adj., adj atroph´ic.
acute yellow atrophy massive hepatic necrosis.
circumscribed cerebral atrophy pick's disease.
disuse atrophy atrophy of a tissue or organ as a result of inactivity or diminished function.
gyrate atrophy of choroid and retina a rare hereditary, slowly progressive atrophy of the choroid and pigment epithelium of the retina; inherited as an autosomal recessive trait.
juvenile spinal muscular atrophy Kugelberg-Welander syndrome.
Leber's optic atrophy Leber's optic neuropathy.
lobar atrophy pick's disease.
myelopathic muscular atrophy muscular atrophy due to lesion of the spinal cord, as in spinal muscular atrophy.
olivopontocerebellar atrophy any of a group of progressive hereditary disorders involving degeneration of the cerebellar cortex, middle peduncles, ventral pontine surface, and olivary nuclei. They occur in the young to middle-aged and are characterized by ataxia, dysarthria, and tremors similar to those of parkinsonism.
peroneal atrophy (peroneal muscular atrophy) progressive neuromuscular atrophy.
progressive neuromuscular atrophy hereditary muscular atrophy beginning in the muscles supplied by the fibular (peroneal) nerves, progressing slowly to involve the muscles of the hands and arms. Called also peroneal or peroneal muscular atrophy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.
senile atrophy the natural atrophy of tissues and organs occurring with advancing age.
spinal muscular atrophy progressive degeneration of the motor cells of the spinal cord, beginning usually in the small muscles of the hands, but in some cases (scapulohumeral type) in the upper arm and shoulder muscles, and progressing slowly to the leg muscles. Called also Aran-Duchenne disease, Cruveilhier's disease, and Duchenne's disease.
subacute yellow atrophy submassive necrosis of the liver associated with broad zones of necrosis, due to viral, toxic, or drug-induced hepatitis; it may have an acute course with death from liver failure occurring after several weeks, or clinical recovery may be associated with regeneration of the parenchymal cells.

dis·use at·ro·phy

muscle wasting caused by immobilization, such as casting.

disuse atrophy

A generic term encompassing the degenerative changes that tissues undergo when they are functioning at suboptimal levels; involvement of the musculoskeletal unit is characterized by atrophy of muscles, contraction of tendons and osteoporosis; diversion of GI tract flow results in a DA-type phenomenon known as diversion colitis

disuse atrophy

loss of muscle mass due to inactivity. May follow a period of immobilization, e.g. bed rest or with a plaster cast. Prolonged disuse results in fibrous tissue replacing muscle tissue, limiting the extent of full rehabilitation.

atrophy

1. decrease in size of a normally developed organ or tissue; wasting.
2. to undergo or cause atrophy.

disuse atrophy
atrophy of local musculature due to failure to use a part of the body, due usually to pain. Is separate from neurogenic atrophy when nerve damage causes atrophy from both disuse and denervation.
iris atrophy
occurs with aging, particularly in Siamese cats and miniature schnauzers and poodles; may be secondary to trauma, recurrent uveitis and chronic glaucoma.
mammary atrophy
the terminal stage of chronic mastitis; palpation establishes that little mammary tissue remains and inflammatory fibrous tissue has subsided.
Enlarge picture
Blind quarter (atrophy) in a cow following mastitis. By permission from Blowey RW, Weaver AD, Diseases and Disorders of Cattle, Mosby, 1997
optic atrophy
atrophy of the optic nerve; may occur with trauma, prolonged inflammatory diseases of the eye, and retinal degeneration.
retinal atrophy
see progressive retinal atrophy.
serous atrophy
in cachexia there is mobilization of depot fat and lipid vacuoles are progressively reduced in size and replaced by proteinaceous fluid which converts the fat depots to gelatinous masses of serous atrophy.
villous atrophy
a common finding in a variety of intestinal diseases of animals, including viral, bacterial and protozoal infections, parasitism, hypersensitivity reactions in the bowel and alimentary lymphosarcoma. Malabsorption and diarrhea result. An idiopathic, possibly immune-mediated, villous atrophy occurs in dogs.
References in periodicals archive ?
8) Long duration of non-intake of oral feeds during the course of treatment along with ryle's tube dependence has been implicated in inducing disuse atrophy of the pharyngeal muscles.
Because recovery from disuse atrophy is delayed with aging, minimizing the period of unweighting and immobilization is optimal.
The company has developed, patented, and clinically tested a unique rehabilitation product, the VibeTech Rehab Chair (VRC), to reduce or reverse disuse atrophy in immobile and functionally impaired individuals who cannot tolerate weight bearing physical activity.
These include disuse atrophy, acute inflammatory atrophy associated with trauma (Sudeck's atrophy or algodystrophy), primary and metastatic tumours, hyperparathyroidism, gout, congenital pseudarthrosis, granulomatous diseases, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes mellitus, psoriatic arthritis, osteomyelitis, systemic mastocytosis, aseptic necrosis, neurogenic arthropathy, prolonged steroid therapy, bony aneurysm, and cystic angiomatous of bone.
Introduced to the US market in early 2010, the Kneehab[R] XP Quadriceps Therapy System is used as an adjunctive therapy device for post-surgical rehabilitation of the knee, as well as quadriceps muscle re-education, prevention of disuse atrophy and increased range of motion of the knee.