distributive justice


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distributive justice

(dis-trib′yŭ-tiv)
The ethical concept that favors the value of doing some good for a community, as opposed to doing great good for an individual. It may be illustrated by the dilemma of providing a costly organ transplant to save the life of one person versus providing vaccination against polio to thousands of others. When monetary resources are limited, health care planners, providers, and patients compete for those resources and must decide whether to concentrate them on a single major task or distribute them broadly to the population at large.
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Most of the prior research in the area of organizational justice has focused on two major issues: firstly, employees' responses to the outcomes they receive, that is distributive justice and, secondly, the means or procedures by which they obtain these outcomes, that is procedural justice (Cropanzano & Greenberg, 1997).
Jasay's fairly typical libertarian theory of distributive justice holds that the only principles that matter in such talk are private property and free exchange, and that any distribution resulting from people following those rules is ipso facto moral and/or just.
Scholastic economics was taught at the highest university level for five centuries, until Adam Smith's revised classical economics drastically oversimplified the scholastic theory he had been taught by Francis Hutcheson, thus reducing economic theory from four elements to two (production and exchange) by eliminating Augustine's theories of utility (the choice of scarce means) and personal distribution and Aristotle's theory of distributive justice (the choice of persons as ends).
Aristotle evidently does not regard the assessment of existing property distributions in terms of distributive justice as a fruitful task for political philosophy.
2010, that the organizations have a set rules and regulations to determine the procedures in decision making, and therefore referents for procedural justice and distributive justice will be the organization.
In philosophical terms, distributive justice is conceptualized as the perceived fairness of negotiated outcomes.
Keywords Locals * Expatriates * Compensation disparity * Distributive justice * Norms * China
M, (1989): "Effects of Procedural Justice and Distributive Justice on Reaction to Pay raise Decision," Academy of Management Journal, Vol.
Although much of Forst's discussion is highly abstract, the book's penultimate chapter beautifully imagines a conversation in the Global Court of Distributive Justice as it addresses a Brazilian pit-mine laborer's demand for justification.
Many argue that while certain conditions for application of some principles are present on both levels, conditions for application of principles of distributive justice are present only at the state level.
Fourth, starting in the mid-1990s, the Unocal (4) line of cases against corporate defendants and other legal persons and entities helped to fill a distributive justice gap.