distribution

(redirected from distributing)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

distribution

 [dis″trĭ-bu´shun]
1. the specific location or arrangement of continuing or successive objects or events in space or time.
2. the extent of a ramifying structure such as an artery or nerve and its branches.
3. the geographical range of an organism or disease.
frequency distribution in statistics, a mathematical function that describes the distribution of measurements on a scale for a specific population.
normal distribution a symmetrical distribution of scores with the majority concentrated around the mean; for example, that representing a large number of independent random events. It is in the shape of a bell-shaped curve. Called also gaussian distribution. See illustration.
 Normal distribution. The approximate percentage of the area (or frequency) lying under the curve between standard deviations is indicated. From Dorland's, 2000.
probability distribution a mathematical function that assigns to each measurable event in a sample group the probability that the event will occur.

dis·tri·bu·tion

(dis'tri-byū'shŭn),
1. The passage of the branches of arteries or nerves to the tissues and organs.
2. The area in which the branches of an artery or a nerve terminate, or the area supplied by such an artery or nerve.
3. The relative numbers of people in each of various categories or populations such as in different age, gender, or occupational samples.
4. Partition.
5. The pattern of occurrence of a substance within or between organelles, cells, tissues, organisms, or taxa.
[L. distribuo, pp. -tributus, to distribute, fr. tribus, a tribe]

distribution

/dis·tri·bu·tion/ (dis″trĭ-bu´shun)
1. the specific location or arrangement of continuing or successive objects or events in space or time.
2. the extent of a ramifying structure such as an artery or nerve and its branches.
3. the geographical range of an organism or disease.

chi-square distribution  a distribution of sample differences using observations of a random sample drawn from a normal population.
normal distribution  a continuous probability density function roughly characterizing a random variable that is the sum of a large number of independent random events; usually represented by a smooth bell-shaped curve symmetric about the mean.
Enlarge picture
Normal distribution. The approximate percentage of the area (or frequency) lying under the curve between standard deviations is indicated.

distribution

(dĭs′trə-byo͞o′shən)
n.
1. The extension of the branches of arteries or nerves to the tissues and organs.
2. The area in which the branches of an artery or a nerve terminate, or the area supplied by such an artery or nerve.
3. The geographic occurrence or range of an organism.
4. A characterization of the occurrence of the actual unique values in a set of data (as in a frequency distribution) or of the theoretical unique values of a random variable (as in a probability distribution).

dis′tri·bu′tion·al adj.

distribution

the location of medications in various organs and tissues after administration. The concentration of highly water-soluble drugs may be greater in persons who are elderly, dehydrated, or febrile because they have less total body water for dilution of the substance. As the lean muscle mass decreases and body fat increases, drugs that are distributed primarily in body fat have a more prolonged effect.

distribution

Medspeak
The location or site of predilecton of a lesion or process.

Pharmacology
The reversible transfer of a drug from one site to another in the body.
 
Statistics
A group of ordered values; the frequencies or relative frequencies of all possible values of a characteristic.

distribution

Clinical medicine The pattern of involvement of a tissue by a particular condition. See Batwing distribution, Fat distribution, Mocassin distribution, Stocking & glove distribution Epidemiology The frequency and pattern of health-related characteristics and events in a population Pharmacology The location–eg intravascular or extravascular of a therapeutic agent after absorption, which corresponds to the sum of its distribution and elimination; disposition includes both the alpha and beta portions of a declining serum dose concentration versus time curve. See Disposition, Elimination.

dis·tri·bu·tion

(dis'tri-byū'shŭn)
1. The passage of the branches of arteries or nerves to the tissues and organs.
2. The area in which the branches of an artery or a nerve terminate, or the area supplied by such an artery or nerve.
3. Passage of an agent through blood or lymph to body sites remote from the site(s) of contact and absorption; thus called systemic distribution.
4. The relative numbers of people in each of various categories or populations, such as in different age, sex, or occupational samples.
5. The pattern of occurrence of a substance within or between cells, tissues, organisms, or taxa.
[L. dis-tribuo, pp. -tributus, to distribute, fr. tribus, a tribe]

distribution

the occurrence of a species over the total area in which it occurs, i.e. its range or geographical distribution. In aquatic organisms or soil organisms, or even organisms living on mountains, vertical distribution is also important. In some organisms vertical distribution may vary seasonally, as does geographical distribution, particularly in migratory forms. See also FREQUENCY DISTRIBUTION, DISPERSION.

dis·tri·bu·tion

(dis'tri-byū'shŭn)
1. Passage of branches of arteries or nerves to tissues and organs.
2. Area in which branches of an artery or a nerve terminate or area supplied by such artery or nerve.
[L. dis-tribuo, pp. -tributus, to distribute, fr. tribus, a tribe]

distribution

the arrangement of numerical data. The arrangement may be in accordance with magnitude, a frequency distribution, or in relation to geographical location, a spatial distribution.

age distribution
see age distribution.
bimodal distribution
the distribution has two regions of high frequency of observations separated by a zone of low frequency.
binomial distribution
a probability distribution associated with two mutually exclusive outcomes.
cluster distribution
a nonrandom distribution with observations aggregating about geographic or temporal variables. May be deceptive and merely reflect the distribution of an uneven population.
frequency distribution
a table or graph of the frequency of occurrence of each value of a variable.
Gaussian distribution
see normal distribution (below).
hypergeometric distribution
may apply to sampling without replacement of a finite population.
lognormal distribution
a distribution which is normal when the log values of the variable are considered.
normal distribution
a graph of the distribution appears as a bell-shaped curve which is symmetrical on the two sides of the vertical axis through the peak of the curve. Called also gaussian distribution.
parent distribution
the distribution (population) that was originally sampled.
Poisson distribution
regular distribution
distributed at regular intervals of time or space; all values within its given interval are equally likely.
sex distribution
an increase in frequency in one sex, which includes neutered males and neutered females. Called also sex-linked or sex-associated.
skewed distribution
a distribution in which the curve illustrating it is not symmetrical but has a long tail on one or other side of the graph.
spatial distribution
variations in distribution related to position in space, e.g. close to the door of a barn.
t-distribution
see t-test.
temporal distribution
variation in distribution related to time, e.g. occurrence of disease incidents after visits by veterinarians, inseminators, feed salesmen.
References in periodicals archive ?
If new regulations were to impose a strict carryover basis (or a carryover ELA) requirement, where the relative values of the distributing and controlled corporations are reflected in the basis allocations, they could have the effect of duplicating gain recognized on the ultimate distribution of the subsidiaries.
Because Congress was clearly allowing a less-than-50% postdistribution change in ownership of either Distributing or Controlled (in a disposition that does not constitute a prohibited device) without adversely affecting the tax-free qualification of the distribution, the TRA '97 made a conforming change to the definition of control in a divisive reorganization.
Providing a key employee with a stock interest in Distributing or Controlled may be a valid business purpose provided the taxpayer can demonstrate (1) a real and substantial corporate business purpose for the stock transfer, (2) why the individual is a key employee, and (3) why it is necessary to give the individual the type and amount of the proposed stock interest.
distributing corporation recognizes gain on assets distributed.
Target Distributing shares 3Com's commitment to helping organizations fully realize the potential of a converged network," said Michael Momsen, general manager, Target Distributing.
There was also a disparity in treatment depending on whether Distributing or Controlled was acquired.
None of the possibilities allow OLM to achieve the desired objective of distributing the PTI account to L, while avoiding dividend treatment to M.
Computer Telephony Distributing is a leading distributor of VoIP products, solutions and professional services located in Greenville, SC.
Working closely together on their exciting brand marketing initiatives, we will focus on increasing exposure for brand Clearly Canadian in our market in 2004 and beyond," said Steve Lipe, Vice President of Beverages, Columbia Distributing Company.
Distributing AE&P instead of AAA leaves the AAA undiminished, so that it can be distributed free of tax in subsequent years.
As a first step in this new relationship, D&H Distributing has joined the CompTIA Home Technology Integrator (HTI+(TM)) certification advisory committee, a group of leading manufacturers, retailers, educators, and courseware developers responsible for setting the direction of the HTI+ certification.
1970), the distributing corporation (D) contributed property, including real estate subject to a mortgage of $2 million taken out immediately before the transfer, to the controlled corporation (C) and distributed the C stock to the D shareholders.