distress

(redirected from distresses)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

distress

 [dĭ-stres´]
physical or mental anguish or suffering.
respiratory distress see adult respiratory distress syndrome and respiratory distress syndrome of newborn.
risk for spiritual distress a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as being at risk for an altered state of harmonious connectedness with all of life and the universe in which dimensions that transcend and empower the self may be disrupted.
spiritual distress
1. discomfort related to religious, intellectual, or cultural concerns.
2. a nursing diagnosis approved by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as disruption in the life principle that pervades a person's entire being and that integrates and transcends his or her biological and psychosocial nature. The person experiencing spiritual distress may express concern with the meaning of life and death, question the meaning of suffering or of his or her own existence, verbalize inner conflict about beliefs, express anger toward God or other Supreme Being (however defined), or actively seek spiritual assistance.

dis·tress

(dis-tres'),
Mental or physical suffering or anguish.
[L. distringo, to draw asunder]

distress

/dis·tress/ (dis-tres´) anguish or suffering.
idiopathic respiratory distress of newborn  respiratory distress syndrome of newborn.

distress

(dĭ-strĕs′)
n.
1. Anxiety or mental suffering.
2. Bodily dysfunction or discomfort caused by disease or injury.

dis·tress′ adj.

distress

[distres′]
Etymology: ME, distressen, to cause sorrow
an emotional or physical state of pain, sorrow, misery, suffering, or discomfort.

dis·tress

(dis-tres')
Mental or physical suffering or anguish.
[L. distringo, to draw asunder]

distress,

n harmful stress that tends to disturb the balance of body and mind and promotes ill health.

distress

physical or mental anguish or suffering.
References in classic literature ?
War between the States, in the first period of their separate existence, would be accompanied with much greater distresses than it commonly is in those countries where regular military establishments have long obtained.
It will be found, indeed, on a candid review of our situation, that some of the distresses under which we labor have been erroneously charged on the operation of our governments; but it will be found, at the same time, that other causes will not alone account for many of our heaviest misfortunes; and, particularly, for that prevailing and increasing distrust of public engagements, and alarm for private rights, which are echoed from one end of the continent to the other.
166} The reader will note how the spoiling of good food distresses the writer even in such a supreme moment as this.
To have to be so uncertain as to the future, to have to be unable to foretell what is going to happen, distresses me deeply.