distress


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Related to distress: destress, Emotional distress, psychological distress

distress

 [dĭ-stres´]
physical or mental anguish or suffering.
respiratory distress see adult respiratory distress syndrome and respiratory distress syndrome of newborn.
risk for spiritual distress a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as being at risk for an altered state of harmonious connectedness with all of life and the universe in which dimensions that transcend and empower the self may be disrupted.
spiritual distress
1. discomfort related to religious, intellectual, or cultural concerns.
2. a nursing diagnosis approved by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as disruption in the life principle that pervades a person's entire being and that integrates and transcends his or her biological and psychosocial nature. The person experiencing spiritual distress may express concern with the meaning of life and death, question the meaning of suffering or of his or her own existence, verbalize inner conflict about beliefs, express anger toward God or other Supreme Being (however defined), or actively seek spiritual assistance.

dis·tress

(dis-tres'),
Mental or physical suffering or anguish.
[L. distringo, to draw asunder]

distress

/dis·tress/ (dis-tres´) anguish or suffering.
idiopathic respiratory distress of newborn  respiratory distress syndrome of newborn.

distress

(dĭ-strĕs′)
n.
1. Anxiety or mental suffering.
2. Bodily dysfunction or discomfort caused by disease or injury.

dis·tress′ adj.

distress

[distres′]
Etymology: ME, distressen, to cause sorrow
an emotional or physical state of pain, sorrow, misery, suffering, or discomfort.

dis·tress

(dis-tres')
Mental or physical suffering or anguish.
[L. distringo, to draw asunder]

distress,

n harmful stress that tends to disturb the balance of body and mind and promotes ill health.

distress

physical or mental anguish or suffering.
References in periodicals archive ?
Support groups are not effective in managing moral distress associated with futility.
Little & Byers, 2000; Renaud & Byers, 1999); however, much less is known about the relationship between real-life sexual experiences and distress from sexual thoughts.
The study used the moral distress scale, a validated survey instrument to measure moral distress.
The risk of psychological distress increased by 14 percent for each hour of nightly sleep loss, such that those sleeping less than six hours a night were twice as likely to be experiencing distress as average sleepers.
by Committee on Recognition and Alleviation of Distress in Laboratory Animals, Institute for Laboratory Animal Research, Division on Earth and Life Studies.
Since not specifically excluded by section 104, damages that do not relate to physical injuries, such as those paid for emotional distress, typically are included in a taxpayer's income and are subject to tax.
Murphy was successful; an administrative law judge awarded compensatory damages totaling $70,000, $45,000 for "emotional distress or mental anguish" and $25,000 for "injury to professional reputation.
Distinguishing between mere symptoms of emotional distress (no exclusion) and physical sickness (excludable) isn't easy, which leaves taxpayers with a tough choice: forgo claiming the exclusion or claim it and fight about it later.
If I'm not mistaken, sin, death, and the devil tried to distress Jesus in the grave.
To reiterate, we concluded that quarantine might result in considerable psychological distress in the forms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depressive symptoms, but we clearly qualify this conclusion by stating that the results of the study are hypothesis-generating and require further exploration.
Understanding the relationship between stress and distress can allow vocational personnel to work with consumers in finding positions that maximize productivity and minimize the experience of distress (Steinfeld & Danford, 1999).
Just because Japan has taken the wrong path out of the post-bubble distress does not mean that it will never arrive at a resolution.