distress


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distress

 [dĭ-stres´]
physical or mental anguish or suffering.
respiratory distress see adult respiratory distress syndrome and respiratory distress syndrome of newborn.
risk for spiritual distress a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as being at risk for an altered state of harmonious connectedness with all of life and the universe in which dimensions that transcend and empower the self may be disrupted.
spiritual distress
1. discomfort related to religious, intellectual, or cultural concerns.
2. a nursing diagnosis approved by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as disruption in the life principle that pervades a person's entire being and that integrates and transcends his or her biological and psychosocial nature. The person experiencing spiritual distress may express concern with the meaning of life and death, question the meaning of suffering or of his or her own existence, verbalize inner conflict about beliefs, express anger toward God or other Supreme Being (however defined), or actively seek spiritual assistance.

dis·tress

(dis-tres'),
Mental or physical suffering or anguish.
[L. distringo, to draw asunder]

distress

/dis·tress/ (dis-tres´) anguish or suffering.
idiopathic respiratory distress of newborn  respiratory distress syndrome of newborn.

distress

(dĭ-strĕs′)
n.
1. Anxiety or mental suffering.
2. Bodily dysfunction or discomfort caused by disease or injury.

dis·tress′ adj.

distress

[distres′]
Etymology: ME, distressen, to cause sorrow
an emotional or physical state of pain, sorrow, misery, suffering, or discomfort.

dis·tress

(dis-tres')
Mental or physical suffering or anguish.
[L. distringo, to draw asunder]

distress,

n harmful stress that tends to disturb the balance of body and mind and promotes ill health.

distress

physical or mental anguish or suffering.
References in periodicals archive ?
Patients with diabetes distress are overwhelmed by negative feelings that further impede their psychosocial growth.
Construction also saw a 25% climb in "significant" distress since last year's figures, with the industry making up 14% of all "significant" distress in the region, affecting 2,782 building companies.
Despite our experience, we have not yet reached the consistent level of transparency, preparation, and support needed to successfully prevent and manage moral distress in all nephrology nurse practice settings.
External validity was variable as local or regional studies were not available for comparison, while international studies revealed a wide spectrum of distress among doctors ranging from 6-68%.
The prevalence of respiratory distress in infants admitted to the hospital increases due to increased rate of caesarean section8.
In addition, we provide evidence to identify whether the increase in trade credit observed for firms in financial distress is due to an increase in the offer of credit from suppliers or to an increase in the demand of credit from the distressed firm.
Moral distress is a relatively fluid concept that has temporal and contextual influences (Hardingham, 2004; Oberle & Hughes, 2001; Wilkinson, 1987).
Participants also indicated the level of distress associated with the thought by answering the question, "On average, how much distress do you usually experience when you have an intrusion of this kind?
The proportion of adults with frequent mental distress who were uninsured increased between 1993, when the CDC did the first survey, and 2009, the year of the most recent survey: 21.
The study further identified inadequate pain control for the terminally ill and dying patients as an important cause of moral distress in medical and surgical nurses.
A new onset of psychological distress was found in 239 of 1,992 participants (12 percent) who did not report psychological distress at baseline.
The Internal Revenue Code was amended in 1996 to provide that emotional distress is not treated as a physical injury or physical sickness for purposes of section 104; as a result all damages other than those for physical injury fall within the general inclusion rule of section 61.