distractor


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distractor

in experimental psychology, a stimulus that diverts a participant's attention away from another stimulus that they are required to detect or respond to.
References in periodicals archive ?
During the scans, participants completed the Continuous Performance Task With Emotional and Neutral Distractor (CPT-END).
In keeping with CLT and item distractor research, however, it is reasonable to conclude that a reduction (four to three) in answer choices had a positive influence on students' test performances.
On the efficiency of visual selective attention: Efficient visual search leads to inefficient distractor rejection.
The investigators used sounds at various frequencies as targets and distractors, with the goal of having trainees focus on the target frequencies while ignoring the distractor frequencies.
Preferred item/event as a distractor has been offered as an intervention strategy when an activity associated with challenging behavior does not require active participation.
Use of distractors was applied in a systematic fashion from pictures/words pairs to words only and progressing difficulty of the distractor options from clearly wrong options (e.
The experts have said that movement is a great, natural way to de-stress, asserting that it serves as a distractor from the stressor.
T1 and the distractors were randomly selected from the list of T1 stimuli and the list of distractor stimuli, respectively.
The system also offers a novel compressor and distractor instrument that unlike other compressors and distractors is specifically designed to match the Spyder blade sizes and be used in cases where a small skin incision (30 mm length) is made.
Then, before being asked to make decisions about the items, the participants had to complete a difficult distractor task - memorizing sequences of numbers - to prevent them from consciously thinking about the decision information.