distractibility


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distractibility

 [dis-trak″tĭ-bil´ĭ-te]
inability to focus one's attention on the task at hand so that the attention is too frequently drawn to irrelevant and unimportant environmental stimuli.

dis·tract·i·bil·i·ty

(dis-trak'ti-bil'i-tē),
A disorder of attention in which the mind is easily diverted by inconsequential occurrences; seen in mania and attention deficit disorder.

distractibility

[distrak′tibil′itē]
Etymology: L, dis + trahere, to draw apart
a mental state in which attention does not remain fixed on any one subject but wavers or wanders.

distractibility

Psychiatry The inability to maintain attention; shifting from one area or topic to another with minimal provocation Significance Sign of organic impairment, or a part of a functional disorder–eg, anxiety states, mania, or schizophrenia

dis·tract·i·bil·i·ty

(dis-trak'ti-bil'i-tē)
Level at which competing sensory stimuli are capable of drawing attention away from a given task.

Patient discussion about distractibility

Q. I have a 19 year old daughter who is very distractible and is diagnosed with ADHD. I have a 19 year old daughter who is very distractible and is diagnosed with ADHD. She has a brilliant mind but she cannot finish any of her work. While doing her homework she gets distracted by the light coming from the other room and even during exams she often drifts and leaves sections undone. I know it’s very difficult for her to concentrate on one part of the work. What should she do? Please tell if you have tried.

A. Some medicines are there which can be taken on doctor’s advice. Apart from that you can also explain her to put her problem to the one she is talking, before she gets distracted. Tell her to maintain her eye contact while talking to any one so though she can remain focused. Train her by showing some signal about her distraction. Let her explain about this signal based indication whenever she gets distracted to all her friends so though she can remain with her attention. Tell her to sit close to the lecturer whenever in a class to avoid any distractions. Help her develop a habit to note down whatever thoughts or important information she gets and before she forgets.

More discussions about distractibility
References in periodicals archive ?
Those who are disadvantaged in the ability to process information due to deficits in working memory or attention may be more vulnerable to disruption of self-regulated learning (in academic and social arenas), and their resources may be further taxed if they also have to expend effort on regulating high negative emotional reactivity or distractibility.
Share this information discreetly with key staff to ensure that children are placed with other campers and staff who complement their levels of activity, adaptability, and distractibility.
In the 1995 Annual Review of Pharmacology and Toxicology, neurobiologist Deborah Cory-Slechta of the University of Rochester wrote, "Increased distractibility has also been cited as the basis of [lead]-associated cognitive impairments.
Preterm infants face an increased risk of behavioral problems, ranging from impulsiveness and distractibility to more serious conditions like autism and ADHD.
They are not as helpful for attention and distractibility.
These children also had higher mental processing speeds and improved distractibility scores.
Natalie Phillips, professor of 18th Century Literature and Culture at Michigan State University, who led the study, was inspired to conduct the research when she observed distractibility in herself and others.
People with the inattentive subtype show symptoms of inattention, distractibility, decreased motivation, disorganization, and low energy.
The underlying neurological basis of distractibility in children with ADD/ADHD seems to be a lack of sensory filtration at the level of the caudate nucleus, a group of nerve cells in the brain that acts as a relay station for all sensory input before it reaches conscious awareness.
They measure distractibility, encourage expression of feelings, and test hand mobility.
His family doctor prescribed the medication Ritalin to reduce his hyperactivity and distractibility.
Distractibility was the behavior seen as least acceptable to the employers surveyed, while lack of initiative was seen as the most acceptable behavior surveyed.