distemper


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distemper

 [dis-tem´per]
a name for several infectious diseases of animals, especially canine distemper, a highly fatal viral disease of dogs, marked by fever, loss of appetite, and a discharge from the nose and eyes.

distemper

(dĭs-tĕm′pər)
n.
1. Any of various infectious diseases of animals, especially:
2. An illness or disease; an ailment: "He died ... of a broken heart, a distemper which kills many more than is generally imagined" (Henry Fielding).
3. Ill humor; testiness.
4. Disorder or disturbance, especially of a social or political nature.
tr.v. distem·pered, distem·pering, distem·pers
1. To put out of order.
2. Archaic To unsettle; derange.

distemper

[distem′pər]
Etymology: L, dis, apart, temperare, to regulate
1 any mental or physical disorder or indisposition.
2 a potentially fatal viral disease of animals, characterized by rhinitis, fever, and a loss of appetite.

dis·tem·per

(dis-tem'pĕr)
The colloquial usage for canine distemper caused by an RNA virus of the genus Morbillivirus, a member of the family Paramyxoviridae.

distemper

a name for several infectious diseases of animals.

avian distemper
canine distemper
an acute virus disease of dogs caused by a morbillivirus, and characterized by high morbidity and high mortality, ocular and nasal discharge, vomiting, diarrhea, coughing, dyspnea and seizures. In addition, some dogs develop 'hard pads' (hyperkeratosis of the footpads), persistent muscle twitches (chorea), optic neuritis and later retinal atrophy, enamel hypoplasia (distemper teeth—see below), or a chronic encephalitis. Interstitial pneumonia and demyelinating encephalomyelitis are common pathological features. Also occurs in other Canidae as well as Procyonidae, Ursidae, Mustelidae and Hyaenidae. The disease can be prevented by vaccination at a young age. Called also Carré's disease.
equine distemper
feline distemper
see feline panleukopenia.
phocine distemper
a disease first observed in European harbor seals in 1988 caused by a morbillivirus; clinical signs are similar to those of distemper.
distemper teeth
the pitted, discolored teeth that may result when young dogs are infected with distemper virus prior to the eruption of their permanent teeth. Other insults to enamel formation at this age may also be responsible for this defect.
Enlarge picture
Distemper teeth.
References in periodicals archive ?
Integrating epidemiology into population viability analysis: managing the risk posed by rabies and canine distemper to the Ethiopian wolf.
Although it is not formally licenced, we often use the dog distemper vaccination to protect ferrets.
Negative controls were carried out with urine RNA extracted from a healthy dog without clinical of distemper and nuclease-free water.
4 kg previously diagnosed with canine distemper was presented with history of dysphagia, myoclonus and weight loss since two weeks.
Again, a positive result for both distemper and parvo antibodies indicates that the puppy is properly immunized.
The best prevention against canine distemper is vaccination.
The competitions are designed to investigate problems that Scheiner says "had fallen between the cracks" of previous NIH and NSF efforts--current winners are investigating issues such as bat-transmitted diseases in Malaysia and canine distemper in dogs, lions, and other mammals in East Africa's Serengeti region.
Environment Minister Ross Finnie confirmed the first case of phocine distemper virus after a post-mortem examination was carried out by vets on a common seal found washed ashore at Dornoch in the Moray Firth on September 11.
Distemper, or panleukopenia, attacks white blood cells.
But Wirral wildlife officer Malcolm Ingham said: ``As far as we are aware, there's no suggestion that they have the distemper virus.
Which animals are under threat from a phocine distemper virus which has just reappeared in Britain?
The disease is caused by the Phocine Distemper Virus, which erodes the seals' immune system and leads to pneumonia, reports Reuters.