dissociation


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dissociation

 [dis-so″she-a´shun]
1. the act of separating or state of being separated.
2. the separation of a molecule into fragments produced by the absorption of light or thermal energy or by solvation.
3. segregation of a group of mental processes from the rest of a person's usually integrated functions of consciousness, memory, perception, and sensory and motor behavior, as in the separation of personality and aspects of memory or subpersonalities in the dissociative disorders or in the segregation of an idea or object from its emotional significance, as is sometimes seen in schizophrenia.
atrial dissociation independent beating of the left and right atria, each with normal rhythm or with various combinations of normal rhythm, atrial flutter, or atrial fibrillation.
atrioventricular dissociation a condition in which the atria and the ventricles contract independently of each other, without synchronization of their rhythms.
electromechanical dissociation pulseless electrical activity.
isorhythmic atrioventricular dissociation a cardiac rhythm in which the atria and the ventricles beat independently and at approximately the same rate.

dis·so·ci·a·tion

(dis-sō'sē-ā'shŭn, -shē-ā'shŭn),
1. Separation, or a dissolution of relations. For the following chemical, biochemical, and psychiatric senses, avoid substituting the misspelling/mispronunciation dissociation.
See also: Time-Line therapy. Synonym(s): disassociation
2. The change of a complex chemical compound into simpler ones by any lytic reaction, by ionization, by heterolysis, or by homolysis.
See also: Time-Line therapy.
3. An unconscious separation of a group of mental processes from the rest, resulting in an independent functioning of these processes and a loss of the usual associations, for example, a separation of affect from cognition.
See also: Time-Line therapy.
4. A state used as an essential part of a technique for healing in psychology and psychotherapy, for instance in hypnotherapy or the neurolinguistic programming technique of Time-Line therapy.
See also: Time-Line therapy.
5. The translocation between a large chromosome and a small supernumerary one.
6. Separation of the nuclear components of a heterokaryotic dikaryon.
7. The disassembly of protomers from a larger marcomolecular complex or polymer.
[L. dis-socio, pp. -atus, to disjoin, separate, fr. socius, partner, ally]

dissociation

/dis·so·ci·a·tion/ (-so″se-a´shun)
1. the act of separating or state of being separated.
2. the separation of a molecule into two or more fragments produced by the absorption of light or thermal energy or by solvation.
3. segregation of a group of mental processes from the rest of a person's usually integrated functions of consciousness, memory, perception, and sensory and motor behavior.

atrial dissociation  independent beating of the left and right atria, each with normal rhythm or with one or both having an abnormal rhythm.
atrioventricular dissociation  control of the atria by one pacemaker and of the ventricles by another, independent pacemaker.
electromechanical dissociation  continued electrical rhythmicity of the heart in the absence of effective mechanical function.

dissociation

(dĭ-sō′sē-ā′shən, -shē-)
n.
1. The act of dissociating or the condition of having been dissociated.
2. Chemistry
a. The process by which the action of a solvent or a change in physical condition, as in pressure or temperature, causes a molecule to split into simpler groups of atoms, single atoms, or ions.
b. The separation of an electrolyte into ions of opposite charge.
3. Psychiatry A psychological defense mechanism in which specific, anxiety-provoking thoughts, emotions, or physical sensations are separated from the rest of the psyche.

dis·so′ci·a′tive (-ə-tĭv) adj.

dissociation

[disō′shē·ā′shən]
Etymology: L, dis + sociare, to unite
1 the act of separating into parts or sections.
2 an unconscious defense mechanism by which an idea, thought, emotion, or other mental process is separated from the consciousness and thereby loses emotional significance. See also dissociative disorder. dissociative [disō'shē·ətiv] , adj.

dissociation

Cardiology Electromagnetic dissociation, see there. See also Atrioventricular dissociation, Pulse-temperature dissociation Psychiatry A mental response that diverts consciousness from painful or traumatic associations Examples Shock, numbing, paralysis, loss of speech or other sensory perception, or even loss of consciousness.

dis·so·ci·a·tion

(di-sōsē-āshŭn)
1. Separation, or a dissolution of relations.
Synonym(s): disassociation.
2. The change of a complex chemical compound into a simpler one by any lytic reaction, by ionization, by heterolysis, or by homolysis.
3. An unconscious separation of a group of mental processes from the rest, resulting in an independent functioning of these processes and a loss of the usual associations; for example, a separation of affect from cognition.
See: multiple personality
4. A state used as an essential part of a technique for healing in psychology and psychotherapy, for instance in hypnotherapy or the neurolinguistic programming technique of time-line therapy.
See also: Time-Line therapy
5. The translocation between a large chromosome and a small supernumerary one.
6. Separation of the nuclear components of a heterokaryotic dikaryon.

dissociation

a process in which a chemical combination breaks up into component parts, as with haemoglobin and oxygen. See OXYGEN-DISSOCIATION CURVE.

Dissociation

A psychological mechanism in which the mind splits off certain aspects of a traumatic event from conscious awareness. Dissociation can affect the patient's memory, sense of reality, and sense of identity.

dissociation

Elimination of the stimulus to fusion. It is usually accomplished by occluding one eye, or by inducing gross distortion of the image seen by one eye (e.g. Maddox rod), or by placing a strong prism in front of one eye (e.g. von Graefe's test) with the result that the eyes will move to the passive position (or heterophoria position). See dissociated heterophoria; passive position; diplopia test; dissociating test.

dis·so·ci·a·tion

, disassociation (di-sōsē-āshŭn, disă-)
An unconscious separation of a group of mental processes from the rest, resulting in an independent functioning of these processes and a loss of usual associations.

dissociation,

n the psychologically induced, distinct partition of separate mental functions (e.g., identity, memory, and awareness) from normal behavior or consciousness.

dissociation

the act of separating or the state of being separated.

atrial dissociation
independent beating of the left and right atria, each with normal rhythm or with various combinations of normal rhythm, atrial flutter or atrial fibrillation.
atrioventricular dissociation
independent pacemakers in the atria and ventricles.
dissociation constant
the tendency of a solute to dissociate in solution.
hepatocyte dissociation
hepatocytes becomes detached from their neighboring cells, either generally or locally; a feature of death of the patient.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wolf and her colleagues (41,42), using latent profile algorithm, have replicated and extended the previous findings that dissociation is a salient aspect of PTSD and individuals with a tendency to dissociative symptoms constitute a subset of people with PTSD.
The DSM-IV-TR defines dissociation as "a disruption in the usually integrated functions of consciousness, memory, identity, or perception of the
Although Freud began with dissociation as the foundation of his psychoanalytic theory, he later discarded this concept and instead proposed "repression" as a psychological defence mechanism involved in the formation of neurosis.
The dissociation energies (D) of bonds to ccp atoms were lowered by the resonance stabilization energy of 50 kJ/mol (12 kcal/mol) for each benzyl radical formed (9).
The AV dissociation in the pheasant was determined incidentally during a study to evaluate the electrocardiograms (ECGs) in 24 pheasants obtained from the Gelemen Pheasant Production Station, Samsun, Turkey.
As mentioned earlier, awareness of a client's use of dissociation as a defense against trauma can greatly aid in treatment.
She is now thought to be suffering bouts of dissociation - a condition where people can forget parts of their life following a shock or trauma.
Once dissociation is triggered, a patient starts a reckless activity such as bingeing on food, drugs, or sex or having flashbacks.
The accumulation of a weak acid in the bacterial cytosol--the internal fluid of the cell--will result in acid dissociation if the acid dissociation constant (pKa) is lower than the intracellular pH.
Even the existing Western explanatory models of dissociation fail to accommodate fully the communal aspects of dissociation in our South African context.