dissipation

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Related to dissipative: Dissipative structures

dissipation

(dĭs-ĭ-pā′shŭn) [L. dissipare, to scatter]
1. Dispersion of matter.
2. The act of living a wasteful and dissolute life, esp. drinking alcoholic beverages to excess.
References in periodicals archive ?
Instead we consider conductive floors in combination with dissipative shoes or all shoes.
It is believed that the pressure dependence, dissipative heating, and end effects in the capillary flow are significant under a high shear rate or high pressure.
on the basis of the specific measures of proximity of the generalized and simplified models, and also of evaluation of the amplitude-frequency characteristics of the subsystems of workpiece and tool, for the analysis of the process of chip formation and its influence on the behavior of the system of mechanical processing it is proposed to use a four-contour model of small dimensionality with dissipative characteristics, which account for the structural damping and rheological processes of the global model in question, to which the two subsystems with four generalized coordinates correspond Fig.
The synthesis of globally recognized theories (Capra, 1968), Newton's classical theory, the Theory of Natural Philosophy (Boskovic, 1763), the Quantum Theory (Ponomarev, 1988), the Theory of Dissipative Structures, the Theory of Deterministic Chaos (Stewart, 1996), personal insights and experimental measurements have resulted in a formula that imitates forest growth and development.
Namely for the dissipative processes, the first experimental evidence of macroscopic nonlocality was obtained in the early experiments on causal mechanics performed by Kozyrev (8) (though they were interpreted in other terms).
A parallel quaternion-based dissipative particle dynamics (QDPD) program has been developed in Fortran to study the flow properties of complex fluids subject to shear.
In addition, there must be a source of energy and some sort of dissipative force.
The universality argument is most persuasive when applied to physical systems that have direct analogues to the gradual energy input, dissipative friction, and chain-reaction possibilities of the sandpile.
These damping systems use some form of highly dissipative (or "lossy") material, usually a rubber or plastic compound.
I was similarly stunned when, after providing the class with a brief introduction to chemical dissipative systems (a topic that combines thermodynamics and the law of time), the students immediately, clearly, made numerous connections to the text that gave them access to Bambara's ideas.