disassimilation

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dis·as·sim·i·la·tion

(dis'ă-sim'i-lā'shŭn),
Destructive or retrograde metabolism.
Synonym(s): dissimilation (1)

disassimilation

(dĭs″ă-sĭm″ĭ-lā′shŭn) [″ + ad, to, + similare, to make like]
The conversion of assimilated material into less complex compounds for energy production.
References in periodicals archive ?
The early loss could thus be reinforced by dissimilation of *v away from another glide in the following syllable.
Nevertheless, we would like to bring to attention two remarkable details: first, in random trochees the dissimilation of heavy syllables in odd positions can already be noticed, although it is not so clear as the dissimilation of stresses.
Moreover, in Saami yet a third example of the same dissimilation has been discovered: SaaN coska 'block of wood '< *cucki < *cucki, cognate with MdE cocko 'timber, log '(Luobbal Sammol Sammol Ante (Aikio) 2013 : 164-165).
In (16b), however, where the root begins with the voiceless obstruent /s/, these prefixes undergo voicing dissimilation to gu-, du- and -da-, respectively.
Its chapter on consonants, 55 pages long ("Der Konsonantismus"), included references to Luick's paper on palatalisation of 1935 and to the relevant sections of the Grammatik (363), h-spellings (364), dissimilations (375), and the change [n > m] in loanwords from French (413).
The correspondence between the Saami and Mordvin initial affricates is not regular, but the Saami representation can be quite naturally explained as due to a dissimilation of two identical affricates: PU *cucki >> Pre-PSaa *cucki.
Muller-Kessler appears to be unfamiliar with the precise meaning of the linguistic terms assimilation and dissimilation, since elsewhere she describes the form [?
It is common, for example, for one of the two copies in morphological reduplication to undergo dissimilation.
16) The Northumbrian metathesis or anaptyxis affecting /Vrxt/ can thus be explained as a process akin to dissimilation, eliminating a phonetically difficult cluster.
Another potential explanation is the dissimilation of /a > u/, attested in Amorite.
In case of dissimilation a voiced geminate in the weak grade alternates with a combination of a voiced consonant and a stop in the strong grade.
The relationship between grammaticalization and degrammaticalization in this respect may be viewed as parallel to that between assimilation and dissimilation in sound change.