dissent

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dissent

[disent′]
Etymology: L, dis + sentire, to feel
1 v, to differ in belief or opinion; to disagree.
2 n, (in law) a statement written by a judge who disagrees with the decision of the majority of the court. The dissent states explicit reasons for the contrary opinion. dissenting, adj.
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It includes the number of votes for and against each policy directive, the names of any dissenters, and a classification of all dissents as favoring tighter or easier policy or reasons for dissenting other than the stance of policy.
There were only a handful of dissents during FOMC policy votes between 1936 and 1956, all of which occurred between 1938 and 1940.
Second, assessing the value of published dissents in a specific court necessitates a consideration of the unique context within which that court operates.
In Part II, I argue against a uniform practice and present the proposed contextual analysis for assessing the value of published dissents in constitutional adjudication.
Scholarly research suggests that, not only were five-to-four decisions no more likely to garner sustained dissent, there are numerous examples of solo sustained dissents.
65) A characteristic of this, Fried explains, is when a Justice relies on and refers to his own prior dissents as authority.
he stressed that if he could choose only one of his dissents to turn
In the years that followed McCleskey, Justice Blackmun became more comfortable joining colleagues' harsh dissents in capital cases.
This paper presents an empirical study of dissents at the Second Circuit Court of Appeals, with a focus on the one judge, Judge Pooler, who has dissented most in the time period studied.
First, judges and professors of law have for generations cited Holmes's dissents favorably, and in the coming years, according to Ariel Lief, we must "look for complete vindication of [Holmes's] role as a dissenter.
Carter was known as "The Lone Dissenter" during his service because he wrote so many solo dissents defending civil rights, civil liberties, and the rights of labor during the period 1939-1959.
Justice Ginsburg, in reflecting on dissents, observed that "with difficult cases on which reasonable minds may divide, sometimes intensely, one's sense of [j]ustice may demand a departure from the majority's view, expressed in a dissenting opinion.