dissent

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dissent

[disent′]
Etymology: L, dis + sentire, to feel
1 v, to differ in belief or opinion; to disagree.
2 n, (in law) a statement written by a judge who disagrees with the decision of the majority of the court. The dissent states explicit reasons for the contrary opinion. dissenting, adj.
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And his great free speech dissents (with Brandeis, usually) are the most eloquent modern defenses of the central role the First Amendment must play in our political system.
than the argument found in editorials, judicial dissents, and ongoing
Minority; realistic ideals: A judge who is largely responsible for the largest distribution of compensation in Pakistan's legal history to the victims of Karachi's 2012 Baldia factory fire, and a judge who survived a bomb attack by the TTP in 2013, is the Supreme Court justice who has written a powerful dissent in the metro train case.
98 (2000), and the four dissents that criticized it, "let's be in one opinion.
48) In twenty-three of the most prolific women's equality cases to come to the Supreme Court since her placement on the bench in 1993, (49) Justice Ginsburg has offered seven written opinions, including two concurrences, (50) two majority opinions, (51) and three dissents.
This article examines dissents on FOMC monetary policy votes since 1936 with two main objectives.
2) Nor does it answer the all-encompassing question of whether dissent-permitting courts of last resort, including the Supreme Court of Canada and the United States Supreme Court, should abandon the practice of publishing dissents in favour of publishing only unanimous decisions.
Scholarly research suggests that, not only were five-to-four decisions no more likely to garner sustained dissent, there are numerous examples of solo sustained dissents.
In the years that followed McCleskey, Justice Blackmun became more comfortable joining colleagues' harsh dissents in capital cases.
Carter was known as "The Lone Dissenter" during his service because he wrote so many solo dissents defending civil rights, civil liberties, and the rights of labor during the period 1939-1959.
Nonetheless, there were both concurrences and dissents in the early decisions of the U.