dissemble

(redirected from dissemblance)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.
Related to dissemblance: herein

dissemble

(dĭ-sĕm′bl)
To mislead, to give a false impression, or to conceal the truth.
References in periodicals archive ?
No wonder Clegg wants to bring an end to the whole pointless shambles where straight answers are never given when dissemblance is a plausible alternative.
55) Charles Didi-Huberman, Era Angelico: Dissemblance and Figuration, trans.
2) "World-totality," Glissant believes, will depend on our progress toward a transnational creolization, involving the "contact, conflict, attraction, harmony, repulsion, dissemblance, resemblance between cultures of the world," resulting in what he calls "a chaos-world[,] not because it is a world in disorder, but because it is an unpredictable world.
Here as well is interwoven the onomastic farce of Greene's The Comedians (1966) in which, against the sobering backdrop of Haiti's murderous regime under Francois (Papa Doc) Duvalier, characters innocuously named Brown, Jones, Smith, and Baxter play out their assigned roles of dissemblance in "the human comedy" (29).
The straightforward treatment of racial violence in Pickens's journal article offers a striking contrast with the dissemblance of racial violence and its underlying function as an appeal to white urban anxieties about black migration in Faulkner's novel.
In its illegibility within speculative capitalist time, this coded affective demeanor is akin to that of dissemblance identified by Darlene Clark Hine as "an appearance of disclosure, or openness .
The innocence of the New World becomes the naivety of a culture without the leavening of an ironic dissemblance.
1] The history of black feminist theory relates black women's sexuality as silence or dissemblance (Hammonds, Hine, Spillers).
327) In Formal Opinion 737, the New York County Lawyers Association Committee on Professional Ethics concluded that pretexting "is ethically permissible in a small number of exceptional circumstances where the dissemblance by investigators is limited to identity and purpose and involves otherwise lawful activity undertaken solely for the purpose of gathering evidence.
Appearing before a grand jury, Anderson offers up, one of the prosecutors said, "the greatest morass of concealment, dissemblance and demonstrable perjury to which I have ever been exposed in a courtroom.
nineteenth century denotes as much dissemblance as disclosure, as much