dissect

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dissect

 [dĭ-sekt´, di-sekt´]
to cut apart, or separate; especially, the exposure of structures of a cadaver for anatomical study.

dis·sect

(di-sekt'), Avoid the mispronunciation dī'sekt.
1. To cut apart or separate the tissues of the body for study.
2. In an operation, to separate the different structures along natural lines by dividing the connective tissue framework.
[L. dis-seco, pp. -sectus, to cut asunder]

dissect

/dis·sect/ (dĭ-sekt´) (di-sekt´)
1. to cut apart, or separate.
2. to expose structures of a cadaver for anatomical study.

dissect

(dĭ-sĕkt′, dī-, dī′sĕkt′)
tr.v. dis·sected, dis·secting, dis·sects
To cut apart or separate (tissue), especially for anatomical study.

dis·sec′ti·ble adj.
dis·sec′tor n.

dissect

[disekt′]
Etymology: L, dissecare, to cut apart
1 to cut apart tissues for visual or microscopic study using a scalpel, a probe, or scissors. Compare bisect.
2 to tear away the intima of an artery, creating a false lumen that allows blood to flow into the wall of the artery. Branching vessels can be obstructed. An aortic dissection that spreads to the coronary arteries can cause sudden death. dissection, n.

dis·sect

(di-sekt')
1. To cut apart or separate the tissues of the body for study.
2. surgery To separate structures along natural lines or planes of cleavage.
[L. dis-seco, pp. -sectus, to cut asunder]

dis·sect

(di-sekt') Avoid the mispronunciation dī'sekt.
1. To cut apart or separate the tissues of the body for study.
2. In an operation, to separate the different structures along natural lines by dividing the connective tissue framework.
[L. dis-seco, pp. -sectus, to cut asunder]

dissect

to cut apart, or separate; especially, the exposure of structures of a cadaver for anatomical study.
References in periodicals archive ?
The nature of the dissections was assessed as spontaneous or associated with minor trauma.
Accessory nerve function after modified radical and lateral neck dissections.
Furthermore, he gains more and more control over the dissections as the novel progresses.
Aortic branch artery pseudoaneurysms accompanying aortic dissection.
His study of 626 subjects found that migraine and migraine with aura were significantly more common in men and women who had experienced a cervical artery dissection than in controls.
Carotid and vertebral artery dissection account for 10% to 25% of strokes in otherwise low-risk patients younger than 45 years of age, (1) and outcome is generally worse with dissection occlusion than with atherosclerotic occlusion.
In this case, dissection took the place of quartering; it was likewise viewed as a form of supplementary punishment, a further mark of infamy, inflicted on the criminal after death.
The famous philosopher Aristotle, for instance, performed many dissections, vivisections and experiments on various animals, leading to numerous novel anatomical insights.
Unlike a real dissection, mistakes can easily be corrected and the steps repeated.
In general, clinical outcomes for symptomatic intracranial unruptured vertebrobasilar artery dissections are favorable in all patients without ischemic symptoms and in most patients with ischemic symptoms (11).
for the treatment of thoracic aortic dissections, offering physicians increased patient applicability for fragile tapered, dissected aortas.