dissect

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dissect

 [dĭ-sekt´, di-sekt´]
to cut apart, or separate; especially, the exposure of structures of a cadaver for anatomical study.

dis·sect

(di-sekt'), Avoid the mispronunciation dī'sekt.
1. To cut apart or separate the tissues of the body for study.
2. In an operation, to separate the different structures along natural lines by dividing the connective tissue framework.
[L. dis-seco, pp. -sectus, to cut asunder]

dissect

/dis·sect/ (dĭ-sekt´) (di-sekt´)
1. to cut apart, or separate.
2. to expose structures of a cadaver for anatomical study.

dissect

(dĭ-sĕkt′, dī-, dī′sĕkt′)
tr.v. dis·sected, dis·secting, dis·sects
To cut apart or separate (tissue), especially for anatomical study.

dis·sec′ti·ble adj.
dis·sec′tor n.

dissect

[disekt′]
Etymology: L, dissecare, to cut apart
1 to cut apart tissues for visual or microscopic study using a scalpel, a probe, or scissors. Compare bisect.
2 to tear away the intima of an artery, creating a false lumen that allows blood to flow into the wall of the artery. Branching vessels can be obstructed. An aortic dissection that spreads to the coronary arteries can cause sudden death. dissection, n.

dis·sect

(di-sekt')
1. To cut apart or separate the tissues of the body for study.
2. surgery To separate structures along natural lines or planes of cleavage.
[L. dis-seco, pp. -sectus, to cut asunder]

dis·sect

(di-sekt') Avoid the mispronunciation dī'sekt.
1. To cut apart or separate the tissues of the body for study.
2. In an operation, to separate the different structures along natural lines by dividing the connective tissue framework.
[L. dis-seco, pp. -sectus, to cut asunder]

dissect

to cut apart, or separate; especially, the exposure of structures of a cadaver for anatomical study.
References in periodicals archive ?
The case is rare as the dissection was not only extending from the main pulmonary artery(MPA) to the right pulmonary artery(RPA) but also to the segmental branches.
According to this hypothesis, the release of lytic enzymes from eosinophilic leukocytes leads to the weakening of the artery wall and creating of "high risk zones" prone to rupture and dissection.
Weiss KL, Wax MK, Haydon RC 3rd, Kaufman HH, Hurst MK: Intracranial pressure changes during bilateral radical neck dissections.
Spontaneous vertebral artery dissection with thunderclap headache: a case report and review of the literature.
Successful dissection repair was achieved at all the lesion sites with the placement of the Tack implant, as determined by angiography.
At the completion of the 4-hour procedure with 13 sets of coils, the dissection was completely occluded.
Dissection is an integral part of the medical learning process.
Segmental dissection and thrombosis of the left proximal anterior descending coronary artery, as the only finding, is most common (Figure 1).
Primary outcomes for the study were incidence of hemorrhage (based on the BARC classification), death (cardiac death, aortic cardiac death, and other reasons of death), endoleak, recurrent dissection, myocardial infarction, and cerebral infarction in patients with or without antiplatelet therapy at 1 month and 12 months.
A total of 16 cervical artery dissections, 14 VAD and 2 CAD, were confirmed by computed tomography angiography (CTA), magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), or catheter angiography (figure 1).
We describe an oligosymptomatic patient with bilateral progressive vertebral artery dissection.