disruptive coloration


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disruptive coloration

colour patterns which break up the outline of an organism and thus camouflage it.
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White Square only), but did not respond with Disruptive coloration to checkerboard squares located beyond their immediate 0BL annulus (Fig.
Hanlon & Messenger (1996) illustrated six mechanisms of crypsis used by cephalopods: general background resemblance, countershading/concealment of the shadow, disruptive coloration, deceptive resemblance, rarity through 'rapid, neutrally controlled polyphenism, and cryptic behaviour/vigilance.
As regards disruptive coloration, the researcher say that these patterns tend to obscure the outline of the animal against certain backgrounds.
Animals using disruptive coloration use spots, stripes, or other patterns to disguise themselves.
Melanistic snakes may appear less cryptic to predators because they lack disruptive coloration and contrast strongly against natural backgrounds found in the region.
Some animals that are simply too big to blend into their environment exhibit a different form of camouflage, called disruptive coloration, that works by confusing the enemy rather than concealing the animal.
A zebra's brown-and-white stripes are another form of camouflage, called disruptive coloration.
The term camouflage has been used for years even though it generally has been confused with other terms such as disruptive coloration and background matching (Webster et al.
4), the octopus showed a relatively large white leucophore patch at the tip of its mantle, which produced a disruptive coloration effect when viewed closely.
The juxtaposition of colored areas in disruptive coloration attract a predator's attention away from the animal's outline (Cott, 1940; Chiao et al.
With this method, we first showed that certain visual background features were used by cuttlefish to produce disruptive coloration (6).