disposable

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disposable

Nursing adjective Referring to that which is discarded or disposed of noun An item used in health care-related Pt contact which is discarded after use–eg masks, gloves, gowns, needles, paper products, syringes, wipes. See Biohazardous waste.

disposable

(di-spō′ză-bĕl)
Designed to be used once and discarded and not reused or recycled.
References in periodicals archive ?
This approach classifies the outputs into desirable (good) and undesirable (bad) outputs and establishes two concepts: natural disposability and managerial disposability.
Therefore, natural and managerial disposability [8] can be illustrated by them.
X means input vector; y means output vector; C is constant return to scale, and S is the strong disposability.
Among the sedes of books Giroux has published in recent years are Beyond the Spectacle of Terrorista: Global Uncertainty and the Challenge of the New Media (2006), Stormy Weather: Katrina and the Politics of Disposability (2006), The University in Chains: Confronting the Military-Industrial-Academic Complex (2007), and Against the Terror of Neoliberalism: Politics Beyond the Age of Greed (2008).
In terms of easy opening, durability, usability, and disposability, today's food cans offer consumers a simple, elegant, and effective solution.
The most recent major entrant to the market is Upfront Chromatography A/S of Denmark which has combined expanded bed absorption with disposability.
Standardized products are showing robust growth due to their convenience, cost effectiveness, infection control and disposability.
It is a cliche, but in our world of haste and easy disposability, passing that liquid sunset along to my client was its own type of satisfaction.
Jia Zhangke's 24 City gives you food for thought about China's modernisation and the disposability of workers once their labours are done.
Encompassing such concepts as Lily's reification and objectification, the essay explores the ruthless material displays staged by the novel's upper class, solidified in relation to "important ethical and aesthetic" questions surrounding "[t] he disposability and stewardship of objects" (168).