displacement


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displacement

 [dis-plās´ment]
3. a defense mechanism in which emotions, ideas, wishes, or impulses are unconsciously shifted from their original object to a more acceptable, usually less threatening, substitute.
4. in a chemical reaction, the replacement of one atom or group in a molecule by another.

dis·place·ment

(dis-plās'ment),
1. Removal from the normal location or position.
2. The adding to a fluid (particularly a gas) in an open vessel to one of greater density whereby the first is expelled.
3. In chemistry, a change in which one element, radical, or molecule is replaced by another, or in which one element exchanges electric charges with another by reduction or oxidation.
4. In psychoanalysis, the unconscious transfer of strong affective energy or emotion, from the significant object to a neutral one.

displacement

/dis·place·ment/ (-plās´mint)
1. removal from the normal position or place.
3. a defense mechanism in which emotions, ideas, wishes, or impulses are unconsciously shifted from their original object to a more acceptable substitute.
4. in a chemical reaction, the replacement of one atom or group in a molecule by another.

displacement

(dĭs-plās′mənt)
n.
1.
a. The act of displacing.
b. The condition of having been displaced.
2. Chemistry A reaction in which an atom, radical, ion, or molecule replaces another in a compound.
3. Physics
a. A vector or the magnitude of a vector from the initial position to a subsequent position assumed by a body.
b. The weight or volume of a fluid displaced by a floating body, used especially as a measurement of the weight or bulk of ships.
4. The volume displaced by a single stroke of a piston in an engine or pump.
5. Geology
a. The relative movement between the two sides of a fault.
b. The distance between the two sides of a fault. Also called dislocation.
6. Psychiatry A psychological defense mechanism in which there is an unconscious shift of emotions, affect, or desires from the original object to a more acceptable or immediate substitute.

displacement

[displās′mənt]
Etymology: Fr, deplacement, to remove
1 the state of being displaced or the act of displacing.
2 (in chemistry) a reaction in which an atom, molecule, or radical is removed from combination and replaced by another.
3 (in physics) the displacing in space of one mass by another, as when the weight or volume of a fluid is displaced by a floating or submerged body.
4 (in psychiatry) an unconscious defense mechanism for avoiding emotional conflict and anxiety by transferring emotions, ideas, or wishes from one object to a substitute that is less anxiety-producing. Compare sublimation. See also percolation.
Chemistry The substitution of one atom or side chain for another
Dentistry The horizontal shifting of a tooth crown resulting in malocclusion
Global village See Internally displaced person
Molecular biology A shift in location of a sequence of nucleotides
Psychiatry An unconscious ego defense mechanism in which a person’s normal emotions and reactions are repressed, changed, or transferred to more socially appropriate responses, often to allay anxiety

displacement

Psychiatry An unconscious ego defense mechanism in which a person's normal emotions and reactions are repressed, changed, or transferred to more socially appropriate responses, often to allay anxiety. See Acting out.

dis·place·ment

(dis-plās'mĕnt)
1. Removal from the normal location or position.
2. The adding to a fluid (particularly a gas) in an open vessel one of greater density whereby the first is expelled.
3. chemistry A change in which one element, radical, or molecule is replaced by another, or in which one element exchanges electric charges with another by reduction or oxidation.
4. psychiatry The transfer of impulses from one expression to another, as from fighting to talking.

Displacement

A psychological process in which feelings originating from one source are expressed outwardly in terms of concern or preoccupation with an issue or problem that the patient considers more acceptable. In some BDD patients, obsession about the body includes displaced feelings, often related to a history of childhood abuse.

displacement

(1) change in position of a body or object, including size (magnitude) and direction of change, i.e. a vector quantity. linear displacement the distance and direction between the start and end point. Contains a measure of distance (e.g. metres) and a measure of direction (e.g. an angle in degrees to the horizontal) - effectively the distance and direction 'as the crow flies'. angular displacement the angle between the start and finish positions in a rotational movement, including a direction (e.g. clockwise or anticlockwise). Measured in degrees or radians. (2) the volume of fluid (usually water) that is moved when a body or object is immersed in it. (Displacement must be distinguished from 'distance moved' which includes only magnitude and not direction.)

displacement

removal to an abnormal location or position.

displacement of abomasum
see left, right abomasal displacement.
fracture displacement
the movement of fractured bone fragments away from their relatively normal alignment.
inherited displacement of molar teeth
see inherited displacement of molar teeth.
left dorsal colon displacement
see left colon displacement colic.
liver displacement
see liver displacement.
References in periodicals archive ?
Click here for the full Notice, along with data to assist LPTV/translator stations in identifying potential new channels prior to the Special Displacement Window.
k] coefficients from estimating equation (1) with the alternative and standard approaches, respectively; that is, the figure captures the estimated earnings losses associated with displacement for the two approaches.
Working with the Unite Ideas platform and team enabled the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre to leverage the efforts of brilliant, talented data scientists from around the world, said Justin Ginnetti, Head of the Data and Analysis Department at the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre.
Displacement sensitivity will remain constant within a frequency range before any resonance frequency (Khan, 2013).
In parallel to the development of the national policy on Durable Solutions for Conflict-Affected Displacement, According to a press release by the Ministry of Resettlement, the Government have undertaken a number of actions and projects to address resettlement including the release of lands held by the security forces, resettlement assistance packages and housing assistance.
According to the news release, the report consolidates data from the UNHCR Population Movement Tracking system and the IOM Displacement Tracking Matrix, enabling the release of the most comprehensive estimates of displaced population figures and trends in Yemen to date.
By applying the appropriate preloading pressure, the GMM rod exhibits a large axial strain while simultaneously increasing the output displacement and force.
The average value of displacement vector azimuths observed in the Campi shaft (considering benchmarks and the control points) is 15[degrees].
d] is the horizontal displacement of the bridge, which can be written as
1] Hall HD et al featured the relationship of disc displacement to dysfunction, osteoarthritis and mandibular growth disturbances but is unclear between the relationships of disc displacement to pain.
Browse the full Proximity and Displacement Sensor Market report at http://www.
This is enough to reliably start engines with up to 28-liter displacement.