displacement


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displacement

 [dis-plās´ment]
3. a defense mechanism in which emotions, ideas, wishes, or impulses are unconsciously shifted from their original object to a more acceptable, usually less threatening, substitute.
4. in a chemical reaction, the replacement of one atom or group in a molecule by another.

dis·place·ment

(dis-plās'ment),
1. Removal from the normal location or position.
2. The adding to a fluid (particularly a gas) in an open vessel to one of greater density whereby the first is expelled.
3. In chemistry, a change in which one element, radical, or molecule is replaced by another, or in which one element exchanges electric charges with another by reduction or oxidation.
4. In psychoanalysis, the unconscious transfer of strong affective energy or emotion, from the significant object to a neutral one.

displacement

/dis·place·ment/ (-plās´mint)
1. removal from the normal position or place.
3. a defense mechanism in which emotions, ideas, wishes, or impulses are unconsciously shifted from their original object to a more acceptable substitute.
4. in a chemical reaction, the replacement of one atom or group in a molecule by another.

displacement

(dĭs-plās′mənt)
n.
1.
a. The act of displacing.
b. The condition of having been displaced.
2. Chemistry A reaction in which an atom, radical, ion, or molecule replaces another in a compound.
3. Physics
a. A vector or the magnitude of a vector from the initial position to a subsequent position assumed by a body.
b. The weight or volume of a fluid displaced by a floating body, used especially as a measurement of the weight or bulk of ships.
4. The volume displaced by a single stroke of a piston in an engine or pump.
5. Geology
a. The relative movement between the two sides of a fault.
b. The distance between the two sides of a fault. Also called dislocation.
6. Psychiatry A psychological defense mechanism in which there is an unconscious shift of emotions, affect, or desires from the original object to a more acceptable or immediate substitute.

displacement

[displās′mənt]
Etymology: Fr, deplacement, to remove
1 the state of being displaced or the act of displacing.
2 (in chemistry) a reaction in which an atom, molecule, or radical is removed from combination and replaced by another.
3 (in physics) the displacing in space of one mass by another, as when the weight or volume of a fluid is displaced by a floating or submerged body.
4 (in psychiatry) an unconscious defense mechanism for avoiding emotional conflict and anxiety by transferring emotions, ideas, or wishes from one object to a substitute that is less anxiety-producing. Compare sublimation. See also percolation.
Chemistry The substitution of one atom or side chain for another
Dentistry The horizontal shifting of a tooth crown resulting in malocclusion
Global village See Internally displaced person
Molecular biology A shift in location of a sequence of nucleotides
Psychiatry An unconscious ego defense mechanism in which a person’s normal emotions and reactions are repressed, changed, or transferred to more socially appropriate responses, often to allay anxiety

displacement

Psychiatry An unconscious ego defense mechanism in which a person's normal emotions and reactions are repressed, changed, or transferred to more socially appropriate responses, often to allay anxiety. See Acting out.

dis·place·ment

(dis-plās'mĕnt)
1. Removal from the normal location or position.
2. The adding to a fluid (particularly a gas) in an open vessel one of greater density whereby the first is expelled.
3. chemistry A change in which one element, radical, or molecule is replaced by another, or in which one element exchanges electric charges with another by reduction or oxidation.
4. psychiatry The transfer of impulses from one expression to another, as from fighting to talking.

Displacement

A psychological process in which feelings originating from one source are expressed outwardly in terms of concern or preoccupation with an issue or problem that the patient considers more acceptable. In some BDD patients, obsession about the body includes displaced feelings, often related to a history of childhood abuse.

displacement

(1) change in position of a body or object, including size (magnitude) and direction of change, i.e. a vector quantity. linear displacement the distance and direction between the start and end point. Contains a measure of distance (e.g. metres) and a measure of direction (e.g. an angle in degrees to the horizontal) - effectively the distance and direction 'as the crow flies'. angular displacement the angle between the start and finish positions in a rotational movement, including a direction (e.g. clockwise or anticlockwise). Measured in degrees or radians. (2) the volume of fluid (usually water) that is moved when a body or object is immersed in it. (Displacement must be distinguished from 'distance moved' which includes only magnitude and not direction.)

displacement

removal to an abnormal location or position.

displacement of abomasum
see left, right abomasal displacement.
fracture displacement
the movement of fractured bone fragments away from their relatively normal alignment.
inherited displacement of molar teeth
see inherited displacement of molar teeth.
left dorsal colon displacement
see left colon displacement colic.
liver displacement
see liver displacement.
References in periodicals archive ?
preparedness and prevention before displacement occurs, to assistance and protection
As we prepare for the [Secretary-General's] climate summit next week the devastating impact of disasters and the massive displacement we see as a result, highlight the need for strong and decisive action to tackle the catastrophic threat of climate change," Eliasson said.
Global internal displacement is everyone's problem, from politicians to private companies, development actors and lawyers - we all have a role to play.
21) The UNHCR's Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement does explicitly include the effects of development projects and natural or human-made disasters as amongst the drivers of forced migration within borders; however, the principles remain dominated primarily by a focus on conflict.
with plausibly exogenous job displacement indicators) causes bias in the estimates on these variables and in the estimate of the duration dependence.
Analysis of the results presented in Table 1, shows that general vertical cable displacements (at the middle of the left and right spans) and the horizontal displacement of the standing pier ([DELTA]t), calculated according to the 3rd degree and engineering formulas delivered by Cosmos/m program are almost coinciding.
Sebald, arguing that music's role in this genre is to "provide the reader with rhetorical strategies for listening to silence," for contemplating the displacement and loss brought about by the Holocaust (p.
The displacement measurement system is composed of two laser displacement sensors, an eddy current displacement sensor and a displacement data acquisition system.
J] are depending of robot's joints elastic displacement and [[DELTA].
The accelerating pace of development in less developed countries has vastly multiplied the instances of compulsory population displacement and resettlement.
Displacement ventilation systems without other dedicated heating systems generally are not suitable for the winter heating conditions (Quazia et.