dispersion

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dispersion

 [dis-per´zhun]
1. the act of scattering or separating; the condition of being scattered.
2. the incorporation of the particles of one substance into the body of another, comprising solutions, suspensions, and colloid systems.
3. a colloid system, particularly an unstable one.

dis·per·sion

(dis-pĕr'zhŭn),
1. The act of dispersing or of being dispersed. Synonym(s): dispersal
2. Incorporation of the particles of one substance into the mass of another, including solutions, suspensions, and colloidal dispersions (solutions).
3. Specifically, what is usually called a colloidal solution.
4. The extent or degree in which values of a statistical frequency distribution are scattered about a mean or median value.
[L. dispersio]

dispersion

/dis·per·sion/ (-per´zhun)
1. the act of scattering or separating; the condition of being scattered.
2. the incorporation of the particles of one substance into the body of another, comprising solutions, suspensions, and colloid systems; used particularly for an unstable colloid system. See colloid (2).

dispersion

[dispur′shən]
the scattering or dissipation of finely divided material, as when particles of a substance are scattered throughout the volume of a fluid. Examples include colloids and gels, such as egg white, soap, and gelatin, which consist of large molecules or clumps of molecules that are able to attract and hold large numbers of water molecules.

dis·per·sion

(dis-pĕr'zhŭn)
1. The act of dispersing or of being dispersed.
2. Incorporation of the particles of one substance into the mass of another, including solutions, suspensions, and colloidal dispersions (solutions).
3. Specifically, what is usually called a colloidal solution
4. The extent or degree to which values of a statistical frequency distribution are scattered about a mean or median value.
[L. dispersio]

dispersion

the distribution of individual organisms once any DISPERSAL has taken place. For example, organisms may be randomly dispersed, under-dispersed (aggregated) or over-dispersed (as in territorial animals). Dispersion should not be confused with DISTRIBUTION which normally refers to a species as a whole and not to individuals.

dispersion

Phenomenon of the change in velocity of propagation of radiation in a medium, as a function of its frequency, which causes a separation of the monochromatic components of a complex radiation. All optical media cause dispersion by virtue of their variation of refractive index with wavelengths. Dispersion is specified by the difference in the refractive index of the medium for two wavelengths. The difference between the blue F (486.1 nm) and the red C (656.3 nm) spectral lines is called the mean dispersion, i.e. nFnC. Dispersion is usually represented by its dispersive power ω or relative dispersion which is equal to the mean dispersion divided by the excess refractive index of the helium d (587.6 nm) spectral line (nd − 1), often called the refractivity of the material,
ω = nFnC/nd − 1
The reciprocal of the dispersive power is called the Abbé's number or constringence (Fig. D8). See aberration longitudinal chromatic; achromatic axis; Fraunhoffer's lines; achromatic prism.
Fig. D8 Dispersion of a white beam of light by a prismenlarge picture
Fig. D8 Dispersion of a white beam of light by a prism

dis·per·sion

(dis-pĕr'zhŭn)
1. Dispersing or being dispersed.
2. Incorporation of the particles of one substance into the mass of another, including solutions, suspensions, and colloidal dispersions (solutions).
3. Specifically, what is usually called a colloidal solution
[L. dispersio]

dispersion

1. the act of scattering or separating; the condition of being scattered.
2. the incorporation of one substance into another.
3. a colloid solution.
References in periodicals archive ?
Metre-Chrome 1500 series liquid epoxy color dispersions contain heat- and chemical-resistant pigments dispersed in epoxies.
2] particles make these dispersions ideal for many different applications.
Both waterborne polyurethane dispersions are manufactured without the use of organic solvents and offer processors an option for reducing volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from the manufacturing process and end-use products.
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This new dispersions plant strengthens our commitment to the fast growing paint and coatings market in China, and the increased capacity helps to expand the local production network," said Gops Pillay, senior vice president, dispersions and pigments, Asia Pacific, BASF.
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An eight-page product guide describes the types of dispersions offered by this company, including polymeric dispersions, paste dispersions, dustless powders, LiquiSperse powdered liquids, wax dispersions and UltraSperse treatment systems.
Several additives can be incorporated in Spectraflo liquid dispersions, primarily internal mold releases.
PITTSBURGH, June 30 /PRNewswire/ -- In 1999, ND Dispersions, LLC was formed as a joint venture between Neville Chemical Company and les Derives Resiniques et Terpeniques (DRT) to manufacture and market water based dispersions in North America.
Nanophase Technologies Corporation, Romeoville, IL, has applied for a patent detailing additional technology to create stable dispersions of nanoparticles in aqueous solutions.
The divestiture of Accurate Dispersions is an important step forward in Eastman's ongoing strategy to improve performance in our coatings, adhesives, specialty polymers and inks segment," said Brian Ferguson, chairman and CEO of Eastman.