dispersion


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to dispersion: measures of dispersion

dispersion

 [dis-per´zhun]
1. the act of scattering or separating; the condition of being scattered.
2. the incorporation of the particles of one substance into the body of another, comprising solutions, suspensions, and colloid systems.
3. a colloid system, particularly an unstable one.

dis·per·sion

(dis-pĕr'zhŭn),
1. The act of dispersing or of being dispersed. Synonym(s): dispersal
2. Incorporation of the particles of one substance into the mass of another, including solutions, suspensions, and colloidal dispersions (solutions).
3. Specifically, what is usually called a colloidal solution.
4. The extent or degree in which values of a statistical frequency distribution are scattered about a mean or median value.
[L. dispersio]

dispersion

/dis·per·sion/ (-per´zhun)
1. the act of scattering or separating; the condition of being scattered.
2. the incorporation of the particles of one substance into the body of another, comprising solutions, suspensions, and colloid systems; used particularly for an unstable colloid system. See colloid (2).

dispersion

[dispur′shən]
the scattering or dissipation of finely divided material, as when particles of a substance are scattered throughout the volume of a fluid. Examples include colloids and gels, such as egg white, soap, and gelatin, which consist of large molecules or clumps of molecules that are able to attract and hold large numbers of water molecules.

dis·per·sion

(dis-pĕr'zhŭn)
1. The act of dispersing or of being dispersed.
2. Incorporation of the particles of one substance into the mass of another, including solutions, suspensions, and colloidal dispersions (solutions).
3. Specifically, what is usually called a colloidal solution
4. The extent or degree to which values of a statistical frequency distribution are scattered about a mean or median value.
[L. dispersio]

dispersion

the distribution of individual organisms once any DISPERSAL has taken place. For example, organisms may be randomly dispersed, under-dispersed (aggregated) or over-dispersed (as in territorial animals). Dispersion should not be confused with DISTRIBUTION which normally refers to a species as a whole and not to individuals.

dispersion

Phenomenon of the change in velocity of propagation of radiation in a medium, as a function of its frequency, which causes a separation of the monochromatic components of a complex radiation. All optical media cause dispersion by virtue of their variation of refractive index with wavelengths. Dispersion is specified by the difference in the refractive index of the medium for two wavelengths. The difference between the blue F (486.1 nm) and the red C (656.3 nm) spectral lines is called the mean dispersion, i.e. nFnC. Dispersion is usually represented by its dispersive power ω or relative dispersion which is equal to the mean dispersion divided by the excess refractive index of the helium d (587.6 nm) spectral line (nd − 1), often called the refractivity of the material,
ω = nFnC/nd − 1
The reciprocal of the dispersive power is called the Abbé's number or constringence (Fig. D8). See aberration longitudinal chromatic; achromatic axis; Fraunhoffer's lines; achromatic prism.
Fig. D8 Dispersion of a white beam of light by a prismenlarge picture
Fig. D8 Dispersion of a white beam of light by a prism

dis·per·sion

(dis-pĕr'zhŭn)
1. Dispersing or being dispersed.
2. Incorporation of the particles of one substance into the mass of another, including solutions, suspensions, and colloidal dispersions (solutions).
3. Specifically, what is usually called a colloidal solution
[L. dispersio]

dispersion

1. the act of scattering or separating; the condition of being scattered.
2. the incorporation of one substance into another.
3. a colloid solution.
References in periodicals archive ?
The high-performance FS-DCM-XXX Fiber-Based Dispersion Compensation Module cancels out distortion from optical signals that have traveled long distances over standard single mode optical fiber (G.
The project goal is to ensure sufficient capacities for the strong demand for Vinnapas VAE dispersions now and in the years ahead.
Astronomical seeing (the mixing of air of different temperatures) is undoubtedly the most destructive property when it comes to obtaining high resolution images, however atmospheric dispersion also imparts serious effects, especially when employing large aperture telescopes with the object of interest located well away from the zenith.
The decision about the practical use of an epoxy dispersion at the end of or after the storage (usable) life declared by the manufacturer for the protection of ceramic or metal surfaces is neither easy nor unambiguous.
Guo and Li (7) refluxed MWNT in aniline to obtain a good dispersion followed by electrochemical polymerization of aniline resulting in MWCNT/PANI nanocomposites.
The DisperGrader is a state-of-the-art instrument designed to measure filler dispersion of a rubber compound.
They have loading up to 90% and boast excellent dispersion, shear and thermal properties.
QT dispersion is increased in patients with heart disease compared to healthy subjects, and prospective studies have suggested that QT dispersion has prognostic value.
The KEPCO technologies that have been newly developed in association with the experiment include variable dispersion control, a system to enable real-time detection for the fiber's dispersion caused by different weather conditions, especially temperature, so it can reduce deteriorations in signal waveforms to achieve stable data transmissions.
Aerodisp water-based dispersions are produced locally at the company's new dispersion plant in Mobile, AL.
Syntegra polyurethane dispersions are produced using a continuous mechanical dispersion process technology that Dow calls DisPURsa, which allows the production of polyurethane dispersions without the use of solvents.
Dispersion causes data pulses in optical fiber systems to broaden, resulting in transmission errors.