dispersion


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dispersion

 [dis-per´zhun]
1. the act of scattering or separating; the condition of being scattered.
2. the incorporation of the particles of one substance into the body of another, comprising solutions, suspensions, and colloid systems.
3. a colloid system, particularly an unstable one.

dis·per·sion

(dis-pĕr'zhŭn),
1. The act of dispersing or of being dispersed. Synonym(s): dispersal
2. Incorporation of the particles of one substance into the mass of another, including solutions, suspensions, and colloidal dispersions (solutions).
3. Specifically, what is usually called a colloidal solution.
4. The extent or degree in which values of a statistical frequency distribution are scattered about a mean or median value.
[L. dispersio]

dispersion

/dis·per·sion/ (-per´zhun)
1. the act of scattering or separating; the condition of being scattered.
2. the incorporation of the particles of one substance into the body of another, comprising solutions, suspensions, and colloid systems; used particularly for an unstable colloid system. See colloid (2).

dispersion

[dispur′shən]
the scattering or dissipation of finely divided material, as when particles of a substance are scattered throughout the volume of a fluid. Examples include colloids and gels, such as egg white, soap, and gelatin, which consist of large molecules or clumps of molecules that are able to attract and hold large numbers of water molecules.

dis·per·sion

(dis-pĕr'zhŭn)
1. The act of dispersing or of being dispersed.
2. Incorporation of the particles of one substance into the mass of another, including solutions, suspensions, and colloidal dispersions (solutions).
3. Specifically, what is usually called a colloidal solution
4. The extent or degree to which values of a statistical frequency distribution are scattered about a mean or median value.
[L. dispersio]

dispersion

the distribution of individual organisms once any DISPERSAL has taken place. For example, organisms may be randomly dispersed, under-dispersed (aggregated) or over-dispersed (as in territorial animals). Dispersion should not be confused with DISTRIBUTION which normally refers to a species as a whole and not to individuals.

dispersion

Phenomenon of the change in velocity of propagation of radiation in a medium, as a function of its frequency, which causes a separation of the monochromatic components of a complex radiation. All optical media cause dispersion by virtue of their variation of refractive index with wavelengths. Dispersion is specified by the difference in the refractive index of the medium for two wavelengths. The difference between the blue F (486.1 nm) and the red C (656.3 nm) spectral lines is called the mean dispersion, i.e. nFnC. Dispersion is usually represented by its dispersive power ω or relative dispersion which is equal to the mean dispersion divided by the excess refractive index of the helium d (587.6 nm) spectral line (nd − 1), often called the refractivity of the material,
ω = nFnC/nd − 1
The reciprocal of the dispersive power is called the Abbé's number or constringence (Fig. D8). See aberration longitudinal chromatic; achromatic axis; Fraunhoffer's lines; achromatic prism.
Fig. D8 Dispersion of a white beam of light by a prismenlarge picture
Fig. D8 Dispersion of a white beam of light by a prism

dis·per·sion

(dis-pĕr'zhŭn)
1. Dispersing or being dispersed.
2. Incorporation of the particles of one substance into the mass of another, including solutions, suspensions, and colloidal dispersions (solutions).
3. Specifically, what is usually called a colloidal solution
[L. dispersio]

dispersion

1. the act of scattering or separating; the condition of being scattered.
2. the incorporation of one substance into another.
3. a colloid solution.
References in periodicals archive ?
QT dispersion before angioplasty, in patients with coronary artery disease was 46.
The graphite oxide is layered structured material which in water yields dispersion that are mostly single layered sheets known's as graphite oxide sheets [8].
The module is available with any dispersion value from -10 to -2100 ps/nm at 1550 wavelengths.
In this paper we present a segmented core dispersion flattened fiber which is capable to be designed as (i) small positive-non-zero dispersion flattened fiber, (ii) small negative-non-zero dispersion flattened fiber, and (iii) near-zero dispersion flattened fiber.
Larger aperture telescopes are affected more than smaller ones because of their better resolving power, so the effect of dispersion becomes significant at a higher object altitude.
A change in dispersion stability can be caused by many processes which manifest themselves by a change in particle size and thus by a change in viscosity and in sedimentation velocity (Loria et al.
The dispersion of standard singlemode optical fiber (SSMF) for wavelength range from 1200 nm to 1625 nm can be calculated using the following empirical formula [1]
La ubicacion de la concentracion de un gas toxico en dispersion permite llevar a cabo acciones preventivas y de diseno industrial (Vazquez-Roman et al.
1%) in water/DBSA (1%) solution (30 min, 50 W), addition of the resultant dispersion into a previously prepared PANI/DBSA (~1%) dispersion (1:1 ratio between the dispersions).
Raven 2500 Ultra recommended for high jetness and Raven 410 Ultra for good dispersion.
Although we do not know enough its cardiovascular and pro-arrhythmic effects yet, in order to investigate the relationship between weight loss and QTc dispersion in obese subjects, it would be better to exclude the patients receiving orlistat.
Also employed is an optical signal amplification technology based on dispersion compensation fibers, which are used for high-speed communication paths, preventing optical signal attenuation from occurring for a transmission distance of 60km or longer.