dispersant


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dispersant

(dis-pĕr′sănt) [ disperse]
A chemical that prevents organic substances from concentrating as sludge in a particular location. Such agents are used to break up oil spills or other substances but may have their own toxic effects.
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Paint grinds seen in many published starting point formulations are often comprised of an acrylic acid polymer dispersant (equilibrium stabilizing), alcohol ethoxylate (dynamic stabilizing), and an acetylenic diol (dynamic wetting).
Baby" corals of at least some species are vulnerable to Deepwater Horizon oil and are especially likely to die when exposed to dispersants used during a spill, according to a lab-based study by Mote scientists published in the journal PLOS ONE earlier this year.
Tamol Dispersants from Dow offer formulators a diverse selection of polyacid, hydrophilic copolymer, and hydrophobic copolymer dispersants to meet a variety of formulation demands.
The researchers warned that using such dispersants in oil spills near shore could allow these chemicals to penetrate sands deeply enough to threaten groundwater supplies.
Shell said five ships had been deployed to release chemical dispersants, with two aircraft to assist on Friday, including one that conducted surveillance on Thursday.
It was present months after it was injected into the depths, indicating that the dispersant had not been rapidly biodegraded by microbes.
Dispersants are valuable tools for dealing with oil spills, but there are trade-offs.
Lochhead said the new dispersant is based on scientific principles established decades ago during the development of modern laundry detergents.
Chemist Bob Naman with the Analytical Chemical Testing Lab in Mobile, Alabama, has been testing samples from across the Gulf for oil and dispersant also takes issue with these recent government statements.
We haven't ignored the EPA guidelines," Allen said, noting dispersant use was authorized "on a case-by case basis.
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), held May 26-27 at Louisiana State University, more than 50 scientists concluded that dispersant applications to that point had been appropriate for the Deepwater Horizon response.
There are signs that the dispersant is working, but not without consequences: Corexit may have caused the illness of seven cleanup workers, with symptoms including nausea and shortness of breath.