dispensatory


Also found in: Dictionary.

dispensatory

 [dis-pen´sah-tor″e]
a book that describes medicines and their preparation and uses.
dispensatory of the United States of America a collection of monographs on unofficial drugs and drugs recognized by the Pharmacopeia of the United States, the Pharmacopoeia of Great Britain, and the National Formulary, also on general tests, processes, reagents, and solutions of the U.S.P. and N.F., as well as drugs used in veterinary medicine.

Dispensatory

(dis-pen'să-tō-rē),
A work originally intended as a commentary on the Pharmacopeia, but now more of a supplement to that work, which contains an account of the sources, mode of preparation, physiologic action, and therapeutic uses of most of the agents, official and nonofficial; used in the treatment of disease.
[L. dispensator, a manager, steward; see dispensary]

dispensatory

/dis·pen·sa·to·ry/ (-pen´sah-tor″e) a book that describes medicines and their preparation and uses.
Dispensatory of the United States of America  a collection of monographs on unofficial drugs and drugs recognized by the United States Pharmacopeia, the British Pharmacopoeia, and the National Formulary; also on general tests, processes, reagents, and solutions of the U.S.P. and N.F., as well as drugs used in veterinary medicine.

dispensatory

(dĭ-spĕn′sə-tôr′ē)
n. pl. dispensato·ries
A book in which the contents, preparation, and uses of medicines are described; a pharmacopoeia.

Dis·pen·sa·to·ry

(dis-pen'să-tōr-ē)
A work originally intended as a commentary on the Pharmacopeia, but now more of a supplement to that work, which contains an account of the sources, mode of preparation, physiologic action, and therapeutic uses of most of the agents, official and nonofficial, used in the treatment of disease.
[L. dispensator, a manager, steward]

Dis·pen·sa·to·ry

(dis-pen'să-tōr-ē)
A work originally intended as a commentary on the Pharmacopeia, but now more of a supplement to that work.
[L. dispensator, a manager, steward]

dispensatory

a book that describes medicines and their preparation and uses.

dispensatory of the United States of America
a collection of monographs on unofficial drugs and drugs recognized by the Pharmacopeia of the United States, the Pharmacopoeia of Great Britain, and the National Formulary, also on general tests, processes, reagents, and solutions of the USP and NF, as well as drugs used in veterinary medicine.
References in periodicals archive ?
References to plant remedies for hot flushes appear in Kings Dispensatory of 1898: Aconitum napellus (aconite) is recommended for 'disorders of the menopause, with alternate chills and flushes of heat, with rush of blood to the head, cardiac palpitation, dyspnea, gastric fullness, sense of distension in the bladder, with frequent attempts to pass urine (Locke)' (Felter 1983).
Medical Purveyor Chisolm (65) at Columbia informed Chief Purveyor Johns that, unless notified otherwise, he would consider the United States Dispensatory (48) to be the standard reference for such instructions.
Presumably 1618 refers to the first edition of the London Pharmacopeia, a work that is not directly discussed here, while 1847 refers to the latest foreign translation of the Edinburgh Dispensatory.
His library included a five-hundred-page manuscript in his own hand, Dispensatory, extracted from sources like The English Physician Enlarged (1666) and Pharmacopoeia Londensis (1685), which described the medicinal properties of herbs, drugs, oils, and gums and the manner of their preparation.
Therefore, although the cultural isolation resulting in dispensatory intermarriages has disappeared in the twentieth century, the genetic results of such historical unions remain.
Following in the footsteps of Boyle, Evelyn met Athanasius Kircher in Rome on November 8th 1644, during which Kircher showed him around his "Refactory," Dispensatory," "Laboratory" and Gardens.
On the eighteenth century, see Anonymous, The Ladies Dispensatory, or Every Woman her own Physician, 2nd ed.
King J, Newton RS (1852) The Eclectic Dispensatory of the United States of America.
Stephen Otto's `Identifying a Family Heirloom: The Indian Doctor's Dispensatory,' and Bertrum H.
25,26,27,28,29,30) King's American Dispensatory includes DC, stating that it may possess emmenagogue properties.
Two traditional texts were used: A Modern Herbal (Grieve 1931) for its documenting of traditional English applications for herbal medicine, and the King's American Dispensatory (Felter 1898) for traditional American applications for herbal medicine.
It was included in King's American Dispensatory and quoted as an aromatic stimulant as well as having some other unique indications.