dispensatory


Also found in: Dictionary.

dispensatory

 [dis-pen´sah-tor″e]
a book that describes medicines and their preparation and uses.
dispensatory of the United States of America a collection of monographs on unofficial drugs and drugs recognized by the Pharmacopeia of the United States, the Pharmacopoeia of Great Britain, and the National Formulary, also on general tests, processes, reagents, and solutions of the U.S.P. and N.F., as well as drugs used in veterinary medicine.

Dispensatory

(dis-pen'să-tō-rē),
A work originally intended as a commentary on the Pharmacopeia, but now more of a supplement to that work, which contains an account of the sources, mode of preparation, physiologic action, and therapeutic uses of most of the agents, official and nonofficial; used in the treatment of disease.
[L. dispensator, a manager, steward; see dispensary]

dispensatory

/dis·pen·sa·to·ry/ (-pen´sah-tor″e) a book that describes medicines and their preparation and uses.
Dispensatory of the United States of America  a collection of monographs on unofficial drugs and drugs recognized by the United States Pharmacopeia, the British Pharmacopoeia, and the National Formulary; also on general tests, processes, reagents, and solutions of the U.S.P. and N.F., as well as drugs used in veterinary medicine.

dispensatory

(dĭ-spĕn′sə-tôr′ē)
n. pl. dispensato·ries
A book in which the contents, preparation, and uses of medicines are described; a pharmacopoeia.

Dis·pen·sa·to·ry

(dis-pen'să-tōr-ē)
A work originally intended as a commentary on the Pharmacopeia, but now more of a supplement to that work, which contains an account of the sources, mode of preparation, physiologic action, and therapeutic uses of most of the agents, official and nonofficial, used in the treatment of disease.
[L. dispensator, a manager, steward]

Dis·pen·sa·to·ry

(dis-pen'să-tōr-ē)
A work originally intended as a commentary on the Pharmacopeia, but now more of a supplement to that work.
[L. dispensator, a manager, steward]

dispensatory

a book that describes medicines and their preparation and uses.

dispensatory of the United States of America
a collection of monographs on unofficial drugs and drugs recognized by the Pharmacopeia of the United States, the Pharmacopoeia of Great Britain, and the National Formulary, also on general tests, processes, reagents, and solutions of the USP and NF, as well as drugs used in veterinary medicine.
References in periodicals archive ?
lughadhiya, see Kahl, Sabur ibn Sahl's Dispensatory, 176-77;
Marijuana was admitted to the United States Pharmacopoeia in 1850 and listed in the National Formulary and the US Dispensatory.
The united states dispensatory and physicians pharmacology.
Other 19th century references to the climacteric include herbs for uterine hemorrhage attending the menopause such as Viburnum prunifolium (black haw) and Hydrastis canadensis (golden seal) 'climacteric haemorrhage' in the 1898 King's American Dispensatory (Felter 1983, Lloyd 1887).
A]ny idle mechanic by chance gets a dispensatory, or some old
He occasionally suggests how this literature was affected by factors central to the publishing enterprise: revision of the Edinburgh Pharmacopoeia took place only when the last copies had been "sold off" or the "usual eight-year copyright was expiring" (7); publication of the earliest proposed American Dispensatory did not occur in 1772 when the author was unable to raise the $30,000 to print and distribute the work free to Rhode Island practitioners (208).
His library included a five-hundred-page manuscript in his own hand, Dispensatory, extracted from sources like The English Physician Enlarged (1666) and Pharmacopoeia Londensis (1685), which described the medicinal properties of herbs, drugs, oils, and gums and the manner of their preparation.
It was mentioned in the Flora Virginica in 1762, the Eclectic Dispensatory of the United States of America in 1852, and the National Formulary of the United States from 1916 until 1950.
Therefore, although the cultural isolation resulting in dispensatory intermarriages has disappeared in the twentieth century, the genetic results of such historical unions remain.
Following in the footsteps of Boyle, Evelyn met Athanasius Kircher in Rome on November 8th 1644, during which Kircher showed him around his "Refactory," Dispensatory," "Laboratory" and Gardens.
On the eighteenth century, see Anonymous, The Ladies Dispensatory, or Every Woman her own Physician, 2nd ed.