disparate


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dis·pa·rate

(dis'pa-răt),
Unequal; not alike.
[L. disparo, pp. -atus, to separate, fr. paro, to prepare]

disparate

(dĭs′pă-răt) [L. disparitas, unequal]
Dissimilar, not equally paired.
References in periodicals archive ?
This question calls for a broader analysis of "practical significance" at each of disparate impact's three stages.
I argue that such magnitude inquiries are inappropriately used to evaluate whether a "large enough" prima facie disparate impact exists or whether an alternative policy with less discriminatory impact promises a "large enough" decrease in discriminatory impact, at the first and third stages of disparate impact litigation.
17) Part II of this Note discusses the history and evolution of disparate impact theory and how the rationale used in Inclusive Communities could have a major impact on lenders.
does not, without more, establish a prima facie case of disparate impact" and thus protects defendants from being held liable for racial disparities they did not create.
Higher levels of support for a "no disparate impact" policy are observed among African Americans--41 percent are in favor, while 23 percent oppose it.
This is the third time in the last five years that a case involving disparate impact has made it to the highest court in the land.
NAA/NMHC are currently conducting a detailed analysis of the Supreme Court's decision and will continue to seek further clarification on disparate impact liability.
Ron Glancz, a partner with the Washington law firm Venable LLC, noted that the NCUA included disparate impact, otherwise known as the effects test, in its March 2013 fair lending manual.
However, the district court ruled that ICP had established a prima facie case of disparate impact liability by showing that Texas had approved tax credits for non-elderly developments in minority neighborhoods in a disproportionate fashion and had engaged in disproportionate denial of tax credits for non-elderly housing in predominately white neighborhoods.
Robison states, "You can't cloak a disparate impact claim within a traditional disparate treatment suit.
They also know that risk-based insurance underwriting and pricing that unintentionally result in statistically disparate outcomes among groups bears no resemblance to discrimination "because of" race or ethnicity, which is rightly prohibited by the laws of every state.
While Supreme Court precedent and the Civil Rights Act of 1991 (4) have given courts ample guidance in addressing disparate impact claims brought under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act ("Title VII"), (5) the law is less settled with respect to cases brought under the Fair Housing Act, (6) also known as Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1958 ("Title VIII").