disorient

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disorient

(dĭs-ôr′ē-ĕnt′)
tr.v. disori·ented, disori·enting, disori·ents
To cause (a person, for example) to experience disorientation.

disorient

[disôr′ē·ənt]
to cause to lose awareness or perception of space, time, or personal identity and relationships.
References in periodicals archive ?
These experiences incorporate significant camera movement, player motion, or disorienting content and effects.
What the Hong Kong-born, Thailand-trained filmmakers built from that conceptual kernel is a highly cinematic metaphor for the disorienting terror that such an apparent boon could cause an individual.
In this earlier moment, artists as diverse as Dan Graham, Peter Campus, Bruce Nauman, and Joan Jonas established feedback loops of live cameras and monitors into which viewers could wander: Sometimes their images were replayed to themselves in altered form, as in Campus's works, and sometimes spectators encountered their displaced projections on a short delay or in kinesthetically disorienting environments, as in installations by Nauman and Graham.
On the other hand, it's still a smidgen disorienting to see Christmas programming so utterly cynical about yuletide cheer.
Durant's sound tracks for these works, with songs looped and overlaid in reverse, create a heady, disorienting effect.
Sigel also creates a few arty transitions from scene to scene, and deliberately concocts some disorienting juxtapositions between fantasy and reality.
It is full of deliberately disorienting reflections: Are we inside a building looking out or outside looking in?
In what is touted as the first ``fourth-dimensional'' ride, X's prototype design allows the seats to rotate 360 degrees, disorienting passengers who are suspended in the air off to both sides of the main track.
The new work attracted enormous crowds, who patiently waited to enter the disorienting passages of the two giant spirals as though in line at a theme park.
But she says her job as an American military nurse in ``Pearl Harbor,'' the most expensive super-production Hollywood has ever green-lighted, was not a totally disorienting experience.
Daniele Puppi's videos, with their strongly disorienting spatial effects, are always disruptive--and they achieve this without recourse to advanced technology.