disorientation


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Related to disorientation: dizziness, Spatial disorientation

disorientation

 [dis-o″re-en-ta´shun]
the loss of proper bearings, or a state of mental confusion as to time, place, or identity.

dis·o·ri·en·ta·tion

(dis-ōr'ē-en-tā'shŭn),
Loss of the sense of familiarity with one's surroundings (time, place, and person); loss of one's bearings.

disorientation

/dis·or·i·en·ta·tion/ (-or″e-en-ta´shun) the loss of proper bearings, or a state of mental confusion as to time, place, or identity.
spatial disorientation  the inability of a pilot or other air crew member to determine spatial attitude in relation to the surface of the earth; it occurs in conditions of restricted vision, and results from vestibular illusions.

disorientation

(dĭs-ôr′ē-ĕn-tā′shən)
n.
1. Loss of one's sense of direction, position, or relationship with one's surroundings.
2. Mental confusion or impaired awareness, especially regarding place, time, or personal identity.

disorientation

[-ā′shən]
Etymology: L, dis + orienter, to proceed from
a state of mental confusion characterized by inadequate or incorrect perceptions of place, time, or identity. Disorientation may occur in organic mental disorders, in drug and alcohol intoxication, and, less commonly, after severe stress.

disorientation

Psychiatry Loss of awareness of the position of one's self in relation to space, time, or other persons; confusion. See Delirium, Dementia.

dis·o·ri·en·ta·tion

(dis-ōr'ē-ĕn-tā'shŭn)
Loss of the sense of familiarity with one's surroundings (time, place, and person); loss of one's bearings.

disorientation

Bewilderment or confusion about the current state of the real world and of the affected person's relationship to it. Awareness of time, place and person are usually lost in that order.

disorientation

the patient appears to suffer a loss of proper bearings, or a state of mental confusion as to time, place or identity.

cetacean disorientation
see pinniped stranding.
References in periodicals archive ?
Model of Orientation and Disorientation Monitoring by Ultrasonic Measurements
Disorientation II is an exhibition of works presented by artists from Middle Eastern countries, which explore Arab cities from a perspective in which both unity and division co-exist.
The disorientation of not knowing primed us to be receptive to our subjects, to see them in unanticipated ways.
At intervals, the canyons are spanned by bridges, so departing and arriving passengers are periodically aware of each other, helping to mitigate feelings of disorientation.
The disorientation of not knowing primed us to be receptive to our subjects--to prepare to see them in unanticipated ways.
This embodiment of the disorientation of travel and love was comedic and cathartic, though its pervasive melancholia of loss ultimately rendered it as remote as the topography it charted.
The toxin can cause seizures and disorientation in sea lions, making a rescue much more difficult.
If the same happens in manatees, he says, it might explain their disorientation and seeming inability to swim away from a red tide.
Most of us can't afford a day of disorientation, let alone seven, so learn how to lessen the lag.
The safety board findings were predictable: spatial disorientation, failure to transition to instruments, etc.
Disorientation is greater for migrant workers--China's rural poor who flock to urban areas like Shanghai hoping to get some piece of the action but instead find themselves shunted to the streets, watching an increasingly affluent world pass them by.