disorganization

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disorganization

 [dis-or″gan-ĭ-za´shun]
the process of destruction of any organic tissue; any profound change in the tissues of an organ or structure that causes the loss of most or all of its proper characteristics.

dis·or·ga·ni·za·tion

(dis-ōr'găn-i-zā'shŭn),
Destruction of an organ or tissue with consequent loss of function.

disorganization

/dis·or·gan·iza·tion/ (-or″gan-ĭ-za´shun) the process of destruction of any organic tissue; any profound change in the tissues of an organ or structure which causes the loss of most or all of its proper characters.

disorganization

the process of destruction of any organic tissue; any profound change in the tissues of an organ or structure which causes the loss of most or all of its proper characters.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our enemy is disorganized chaos, which leads to poorly managed risks.
40, except for Item 2 ("It does not bother me if my statistics notes are disorganized before I study them"), which had a structure coefficient of.
A metaanalysis of attachment studies indicates that about 15% of children in a general population sample exhibit disorganized attachment.
Studies suggest that disorganized attachment is only linked with chronic, severe depression or bipolarity in parents.
Eggs from the dosed animals showed dose-dependent increases in problems of meiosis including aneuploidy and disorganized or unaligned chromosomes.
Taxpayers' disorganized records cost them the opportunity to recover administrative and litigation costs.
When it comes to wasting time on the job, socializing and disorganized work areas take a surprising back seat.
Every woman I know can probably relate to many of the symptoms of ADHD--feeling overwhelmed and frazzled, disorganized, unable to focus.
People with piles of paper on their desks may appear disorganized, but a fascinating theory by two social scientists, Abigail Sellen and Richard Harper, posits that people who pile paper do so in very complex and creative ways.
Worst thing about competing: "When they're disorganized, And when there's negative energy from other competitors.
In the past, Baptists seemed disorganized, but they produced "a remarkable and very effective array of institutions and service agencies" (p.