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disorder

 [dis-or´der]
a derangement or abnormality of function; a morbid physical or mental state. For specific disorders, such as the psychiatric disorders, see under the name, such as anxiety disorders and personality disorders.

dis·or·der

(dis-ōr'dĕr),
A disturbance of function, structure, or both, resulting from a genetic or embryonic failure in development or from exogenous factors such as poison, trauma, or disease.

dis·or·der

ataxiophobia.

disorder

/dis·or·der/ (dis-or´der) a derangement or abnormality of function; a morbid physical or mental state.
acute stress disorder  an anxiety disorder characterized by development of anxiety, dissociative, and other symptoms within one month following exposure to an extremely traumatic event. If persistent, it may become posttraumatic stress disorder.
adjustment disorder  maladaptive reaction to identifiable stress (e.g., divorce, illness), which is assumed to remit when the stress ceases or when the patient adapts.
affective disorders  mood d's.
amnestic disorders  mental disorders characterized by acquired impairment in the ability to learn and recall new information, sometimes accompanied by inability to recall previously learned information.
anxiety disorders  mental disorders in which anxiety and avoidance behavior predominate, i.e., panic disorder, agoraphobia, social phobia, specific phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, acute stress disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and substance-induced anxiety disorder.
attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder  a controversial childhood mental disorder with onset before age seven, and characterized by inattention (e.g., distractibility, forgetfulness, not appearing to listen), by hyperactivity and impulsivity (e.g., restlessness, excessive running or climbing, excessive talking, and other disruptive behavior), or by a combination of both types of behavior.
autistic disorder  autism; a severe pervasive developmental disorder with onset usually before three years of age and a biological basis; it is characterized by qualitative impairment in reciprocal social interaction, verbal and nonverbal communication, and capacity for symbolic play, by restricted and unusual repertoire of activities and interests, and often by cognitive impairment.
behavior disorder  conduct d.
binge-eating disorder  an eating disorder characterized by repeated episodes of binge eating, as in bulimia nervosa, but not followed by inappropriate compensatory behavior such as purging, fasting, or excessive exercise.
bipolar disorders  mood disorders with a history of manic, mixed, or hypomanic episodes, usually with present or previous history of one or more major depressive episodes; included are bipolar I d., characterized by one or more manic or mixed episodes, bipolar II d., characterized by one or more hypomanic episodes but no manic episodes, and cyclothymic disorder. The term is sometimes used in the singular to denote either bipolar I disorder, bipolar II disorder, or both.
body dysmorphic disorder  a somatoform disorder characterized by a normal-looking person's preoccupation with an imagined defect in appearance.
breathing-related sleep disorder  any of several disorders characterized by sleep disruption due to some sleep-related breathing problem, resulting in excessive sleepiness or insomnia.
brief psychotic disorder  an episode of psychotic symptoms with sudden onset, lasting less than one month.
catatonic disorder  catatonia due to the physiological effects of a general medical condition and neither better accounted for by another mental disorder nor occurring exclusively during delirium.
character disorders  personality d's.
childhood disintegrative disorder  pervasive developmental disorder characterized by marked regression in various developmental skills, including language, play, and social and motor skills, after two to ten years of initial normal development.
circadian rhythm sleep disorder  a lack of synchrony between the schedule of sleeping and waking required by the external environment and that of a person's own circadian rhythm.
collagen disorder  an inborn error of metabolism involving abnormal structure or metabolism of collagen, e.g., Marfan syndrome, cutis laxa. Cf. collagen disease.
communication disorders  mental disorders characterized by difficulties with speech or language, severe enough to interfere academically, occupationally, or socially.
conduct disorder  a type of disruptive behavior disorder of childhood and adolescence marked by persistent violation of the rights of others or of age-appropriate societal norms or rules.
conversion disorder  a somatoform disorder characterized by conversion symptoms (loss or alteration of voluntary motor or sensory functioning suggesting physical illness) with no physiological basis and not produced intentionally or feigned; a psychological basis is suggested by exacerbation of symptoms during psychological stress, relief from tension (primary gain), or gain of outside support or attention (secondary gains).
cyclothymic disorder  a mood disorder characterized by alternating cycles of hypomanic and depressive periods with symptoms like those of manic and major depressive episodes but of lesser severity.
delusional disorder  a mental disorder marked by well-organized, logically consistent delusions of grandeur, persecution, or jealousy, with no other psychotic feature. There are six types: persecutory, jealous, erotomanic, somatic, grandiose, and mixed.
depersonalization disorder  a dissociative disorder characterized by intense, prolonged, or otherwise troubling feelings of detachment from one's body or thoughts, not secondary to another mental disorder.
depressive disorders  mood disorders in which depression is unaccompanied by manic or hypomanic episodes.
developmental coordination disorder  problematic or delayed development of gross and fine motor coordination skills, not due to a neurological disorder or to general mental retardation, resulting in the appearance of clumsiness.
disruptive behavior disorders  a group of mental disorders of children and adolescents consisting of behavior that violates social norms and is disruptive.
dissociative disorders  mental disorders characterized by sudden, temporary alterations in identity, memory, or consciousness, segregating normally integrated parts of one's personality from one's dominant identity.
dissociative identity disorder  a dissociative disorder characterized by the existence in an individual of two or more distinct personalities, with at least two of the personalities controlling the patient's behavior in turns. The host personality usually is totally unaware of the alternate personalities; alternate personalities may or may not have awareness of the others.
dream anxiety disorder  nightmare d.
dysthymic disorder  a mood disorder characterized by depressed feeling, loss of interest or pleasure in one's usual activities, and other symptoms typical of depression but tending to be longer in duration and less severe than in major depressive disorder.
eating disorder  abnormal feeding habits associated with psychological factors, including anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, pica, and rumination disorder.
expressive language disorder  a communication disorder occurring in children and characterized by problems with the expression of language, either oral or signed.
factitious disorder  a mental disorder characterized by repeated, intentional simulation of physical or psychological signs and symptoms of illness for no apparent purpose other than obtaining treatment.
factitious disorder by proxy  a form of factitious disorder in which one person (usually a mother) intentionally fabricates or induces physical (Munchausen syndrome by proxy) or psychological disorders in another person under their care (usually their child) and subjects that person to needless diagnostic procedures or treatment, without any external incentives for the behavior.
female orgasmic disorder  consistently delayed or absent orgasm in a female, even after a normal phase of sexual excitement and adequate stimulation.
female sexual arousal disorder  a sexual dysfunction involving failure by a female either to attain or maintain lubrication and swelling during sexual activity, after adequate stimulation.
functional disorder  a disorder of physiological function having no known organic basis.
gender identity disorder  a disturbance of gender identification in which the affected person has an overwhelming desire to change their anatomic sex or insists that they are of the opposite sex, with persistent discomfort about their assigned sex or about filling its usual gender role.
generalized anxiety disorder  (GAD) an anxiety disorder characterized by excessive, uncontrollable worry about two or more life circumstances for six months or more.
hypoactive sexual desire disorder  a sexual dysfunction consisting of persistently or recurrently low level or absence of sexual fantasies and desire for sexual activity.
impulse control disorders  a group of mental disorders characterized by repeated failure to resist an impulse to perform some act harmful to oneself or to others.
induced psychotic disorder  shared psychotic d.
intermittent explosive disorder  an impulse control disorder characterized by multiple discrete episodes of loss of control of aggressive impulses resulting in serious assault or destruction of property that are out of proportion to any precipitating stressors.
learning disorders  a group of disorders characterized by academic functioning that is substantially below the level expected on the basis of the patient's age, intelligence, and education.
lymphoproliferative disorders  a group of malignant neoplasms arising from cells related to the common multipotential lymphoreticular cell, including lymphocytic, histiocytic, and monocytic leukemias, multiple myeloma, plasmacytoma, and Hodgkin's disease.
lymphoreticular disorders  a group of disorders of the lymphoreticular system, characterized by the proliferation of lymphocytes or lymphoid tissues.
major depressive disorder  a mood disorder characterized by the occurrence of one or more major depressive episodes and the absence of any history of manic, mixed, or hypomanic episodes.
male erectile disorder  a sexual dysfunction involving failure by a male to attain or maintain an adequate erection until completion of sexual relations.
male orgasmic disorder  consistently delayed or absent orgasm in a male, even after a normal phase of sexual excitement and stimulation adequate for his age.
manic-depressive disorder  former name for a mood disorder now known as bipolar I d. or bipolar II d. and often called bipolar d. (q.v.).
mendelian disorder  a genetic disease showing a mendelian pattern of inheritance, caused by a single mutation in the structure of DNA, which causes a single basic defect with pathologic consequences.
mental disorder  any clinically significant behavioral or psychological syndrome characterized by the presence of distressing symptoms, impairment of functioning, or significantly increased risk of suffering death, pain, or other disability.
minor depressive disorder  a mood disorder closely resembling major depressive disorder and dysthymic disorder but intermediate in severity between the two.
mixed receptive-expressive language disorder  a communication disorder involving both the expression and the comprehension of language, either spoken or signed.
monogenic disorder  mendelian d.
mood disorders  mental disorders characterized by disturbances of mood manifested as one or more episodes of mania, hypomania, depression, or some combination, the two main subcategories being bipolar disorders and depressive disorders.
motor skills disorder  any disorder characterized by inadequate development of motor coordination severe enough to restrict locomotion or the ability to perform tasks, schoolwork, or other activities.
multifactorial disorder  one caused by the interaction of genetic and sometimes also nongenetic, environmental factors, e.g., diabetes mellitus.
multiple personality disorder  dissociative identity d.
myeloproliferative disorders  a group of usually neoplastic diseases possibly related histogenetically, including granulocytic leukemias, myelomonocytic leukemias, polycythemia vera, and myelofibroerythroleukemia.
neurotic disorder  neurosis.
nightmare disorder  repeated episodes of nightmares that awaken the sleeper, with full orientation and alertness and vivid recall of the dreams.
obsessive-compulsive disorder  (OCD) an anxiety disorder characterized by recurrent obsessions or compulsions, which are severe enough to interfere significantly with personal or social functioning. Cf. obsessive-compulsive personality disorder, under personality .
obsessive-compulsive personality disorder  see under personality.
oppositional defiant disorder  a type of disruptive behavior disorder characterized by a recurrent pattern of defiant, hostile, disobedient, and negativistic behavior directed toward those in authority.
organic mental disorder  a term formerly used to denote any mental disorder with a specifically known or presumed organic etiology. It was sometimes used synonymously with organic mental syndrome.
orgasmic disorders  sexual dysfunctions characterized by inhibited or premature orgasm; see female orgasmic d., male orgasmic d., and premature ejaculation.
pain disorder  a somatoform disorder characterized by a chief complaint of severe chronic pain which is neither feigned nor intentionally produced, but in which psychological factors appear to play a major role in onset, severity, exacerbation, or maintenance.
panic disorder  an anxiety disorder characterized by attacks of panic (anxiety), fear, or terror, by feelings of unreality, or by fears of dying, or losing control, together with somatic signs such as dyspnea, choking, palpitations, dizziness, vertigo, flushing or pallor, and sweating. It may occur with or, rarely, without agoraphobia.
paranoid disorder  older term for delusional d.
personality disorders  a category of mental disorders characterized by enduring, inflexible, and maladaptive personality traits that deviate markedly from cultural expectations and either generate subjective distress or significantly impair functioning. For specific disorders, see under personality.
pervasive developmental disorders  disorders in which there is impaired development in multiple areas, including reciprocal social interactions, verbal and nonverbal communications, and imaginative activity, as in autistic disorder.
phagocytic dysfunction disorders  a group of immunodeficiency conditions characterized by disordered phagocytic activity, occurring as both extrinsic and intrinsic types. Bacterial or fungal infections may range from mild skin infection to fatal systemic infection.
phobic disorders  see phobia.
phonological disorder  a communication disorder characterized by failure to use age- and dialect-appropriate sounds in speaking, with errors occurring in the selection, production, or articulation of sounds.
plasma cell disorders  see under dyscrasia.
postconcussional disorder  see under syndrome.
posttraumatic stress disorder  (PTSD) an anxiety disorder caused by an intensely traumatic event, characterized by mentally reexperiencing the trauma, avoidance of trauma-associated stimuli, numbing of emotional responsiveness, and hyperalertness and difficulty in sleeping, remembering, or concentrating.
premenstrual dysphoric disorder  premenstrual syndrome viewed as a psychiatric disorder.
psychoactive substance use disorders  substance use d's.
psychosomatic disorder  one in which the physical symptoms are caused or exacerbated by psychological factors, as in migraine headaches, lower back pain, or irritable bowel syndrome.
psychotic disorder  psychosis.
reactive attachment disorder  a mental disorder of infancy or early childhood characterized by notably unusual and developmentally inappropriate social relatedness, usually associated with grossly pathological care.
rumination disorder  excessive rumination of food by infants, after a period of normal eating habits, potentially leading to death by malnutrition.
schizoaffective disorder  a mental disorder in which symptoms of a mood disorder occur along with prominent psychotic symptoms characteristic of schizophrenia.
schizophreniform disorder  a mental disorder with the signs and symptoms of schizophrenia but of less than six months' duration.
seasonal affective disorder  (SAD) depression with fatigue, lethargy, oversleeping, overeating, and carbohydrate craving recurring cyclically during specific seasons, most commonly the winter months.
separation anxiety disorder  prolonged, developmentally inappropriate, excessive anxiety and distress in a child concerning removal from parents, home, or familiar surroundings.
sexual disorders 
1. any disorders involving sexual functioning, desire, or performance.
2. specifically, any such disorder that is caused at least in part by psychological factors; divided into sexual dysfunctions and paraphilias.
sexual arousal disorders  sexual dysfunctions characterized by alterations in sexual arousal; see female sexual arousal d. and male erectile d.
sexual aversion disorder  feelings of repugnance for and active avoidance of genital sexual contact with a partner, causing substantial distress or interpersonal difficulty.
sexual desire disorders  sexual dysfunctions characterized by alteration in sexual desire; see hypoactive sexual desire d. and sexual aversion d.
sexual pain disorders  sexual dysfunctions characterized by pain associated with intercourse; it includes dyspareunia and vaginismus not due to a general medical condition.
shared psychotic disorder  a delusional system that develops in one or more persons as a result of a close relationship with someone who already has a psychotic disorder with prominent delusions.
sleep disorders  chronic disorders involving sleep, either primary (dyssomnias, parasomnias) or secondary to factors including a general medical condition, mental disorder, or substance use.
sleep terror disorder  a sleep disorder of repeated episodes of pavor nocturnus.
sleepwalking disorder  a sleep disorder of the parasomnia group, consisting of repeated episodes of somnambulism.
social anxiety disorder  social phobia.
somatization disorder  a somatoform disorder characterized by multiple somatic complaints, including a combination of pain, gastrointestinal, sexual, and neurological symptoms, and not fully explainable by any known general medical condition or the direct effect of a substance, but not intentionally feigned or produced.
somatoform disorders  mental disorders characterized by symptoms suggesting physical disorders of psychogenic origin but not under voluntary control, e.g., body dysmorphic disorder, conversion disorder, hypochondriasis, pain disorder, somatization disorder, and undifferentiated somatoform disorder.
somatoform pain disorder  pain d.
speech disorder  defective ability to speak; it may be either psychogenic (see communication d. ) or neurogenic. See also aphasia, aphonia, dysphasia, and dysphonia.
stereotypic movement disorder  a mental disorder characterized by repetitive nonfunctional motor behavior that often appears to be driven and can result in serious self-inflicted injuries.
substance-induced disorders  a subgroup of the substance-related disorders comprising a variety of behavioral or psychological anomalies resulting from ingestion of or exposure to a drug of abuse, medication, or toxin. Cf. substance use d's.
substance-related disorders  any of the mental disorders associated with excessive use of or exposure to psychoactive substances, including drugs of abuse, medications, and toxins. The group is divided into substance use d's and substance-induced d's .
substance use disorders  a subgroup of the substance-related disorders, in which psychoactive substance use or abuse repeatedly results in significantly adverse consequences. The group comprises substance abuse and substance dependence.
undifferentiated somatoform disorder  one or more physical complaints, not intentionally produced or feigned and persisting for at least six months, that cannot be fully explained by a general medical condition or the direct effects of a substance.
unipolar disorders  depressive d's.

disorder

(dĭs-ôr′dər)
n.
1. A lack of order or regular arrangement; confusion.
2. A condition characterized by lack of normal functioning of physical or mental processes: kidney disorders; a psychiatric disorder.
tr.v. disor·dered, disor·dering, disor·ders
1. To throw into confusion or disarray.
2. To disturb the normal physical or mental health of; derange.

disorder

Etymology: L, dis, apart, ordo, rank
a disruption of or interference with normal functions or established systems, as a mental disorder or nutritional disorder.

disorder

An abnormality, alteration, or derangement. See Antisocial personality disorder, Anxiety disorder, Asperger disorder, Arousal disorder, Attention deficit disorder, Autistic disorder, Bipolar disorder, Body dysmorphic disorder, Borderline personality disorder, Central auditory processing disorder, Chromosome disorder, Compulsive personality disorder, Conversion disorder, Cruise-associated diarrheal disorder, Cumulative trauma disorder, Delusional disorder, Dependent personality disorder, Depersonalization disorder, Depressive disorder, Developmental disorder, Disease, Dissociative identity disorder, Dysthymic disorder, Eating disorder, EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorder, Endometrial disorder, Expressive language disorder, Factitious disorder, Functional disorder, Gender identity disorder, Generalized anxiety disorder, Hearing disorder, Histrionic personality disorder, Identity disorder, Internet addiction disorder, Iodine deficiency disorder, Language disorder, Late luteal phase dysphoric disorder, Lymphoproliferative disorder, Major depressive disorder, Martha Stewart disorder, Mendelian disorder, Mental disorder, Motor speech disorder, Movement disorder, Multiple autoimmune disorder, Multiple personality disorder, Musculoskeletal disorder, Myeloproliferative disorder, Narcissistic personality disorder, Neurodegenerative disorder, Neurogenic communication disorder, Neurotic disorder, Nonmendelian disorder, Obsessive-compulsive disorder, Obsessive-compulsive personality disorder, Panethnic disorder, Panic disorder, Partial syndrome eating disorder, Passive-aggressive personality disorder, Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder, Post-traumatic stress disorder, Premenstrual dysphoric disorder, Psychotic disorder, Reactive attachment disorder of infancy or early childhood, Reading disorder, S-100–positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder, Schizoid personality disorder, Seasonal affective disorder, Seizure disorder, Sexual pain disorder, Shared psychotic disorder, Silicone-reactive disorder, Single gene disorder, Sleep disorder, Sleep terror disorder, Smell disorder, Somatization disorder, Speech disorder, Swallowing disorder, Syndrome, Taste disorder, Thought disorder, Throat disorder, Thyroid disorder, Urea cycle disorder, Urologic disorder, Voice disorder, X-linked disorder.

dis·or·der

(dis-ōr'dĕr)
A disturbance of function or structure, resulting from a genetic or embryologic failure in development or from exogenous factors such as poison, trauma, or disease.
[Med. L. disordinare, to throw into disarray]

disorder,

n an atypical physical or mental condition.
disorder, attention deficit/hyperactivity,
n childhood disorder of the brain, marked by lack of intellectual and emotional focus and physical self-control. Generally diagnosed by age 7.
disorder, attention deficit,
n syndrome characterized by short attention span, difficulty concentrating, and possibly hyperactivity. Affects children and adults; males affected 10 times more often than females. May be caused by various factors, such as genetic predisposition, injury, disease, excessive stimulation, and diet.
disorder, badahan (bä·dä·hän dis·ōrˑ·der),
n in Tibetan medicine, a medical condition exhibited by the appearance of eyes that are hollow and a facial expression without emotion. During a careful interview, the mind may be revealed to be blunt and wandering. Feelings of prejudice, persecution, greediness, and self-pity may exist. The patient may feel that he or she does not have a purpose or direction in life. On a physical level, the patient may note fatigue and stiffness of joints. Speech patterns might be slurred and slow. Bodily movements and reactions may be subdued. Body odor may be rancid; breath may smell like tooth decay or periodontal disease.
disorder, bipolar,
n mental illness marked by episodes of depression, mania, or a combination of the two.
disorder, breathing pattern,
n a recurring or continuous irregularity in the breathing cycle.
disorder, chi (dzhē dis·ōrˑ·der),
n in Tibetan medicine, a medical condition characterized by the appearance of eyes that are fearful, worried, and examining. During careful interview, a patient may describe sentimentalism, premonitions, telekinesis, and telepathy. On a physical level, the patient may report fatigue, uneasiness, and giddiness. Hyperactivity, disorganized speech patterns, and poor coordination may occur. Body odor may smell like acid; breath is sharp with a scent like rust. The tongue may turn dark brown or red, become rough, and form irregularly shaped cracks.
disorder, generalized anxiety,
n psychologic disorder marked by vague anxiety symptoms such as sweating, irritability, tension, quivering, dizziness; considered a functional disorder.
disorder, obsessive-compulsive,
n an anxiety condition distinguished by recurring and persisting thoughts, ideas and obsessive or compulsive feelings and/or behaviors. Also called
OCD.
disorder, post–traumatic stress,
n a condition in response to trauma or lasting stress. Identified by somatization of feelings and memories, flashbacks, sleep disturbances, depression, and anxiety.
disorder, rLung (lōōng dis·ōrˑ·der),
n in Tibetan medicine, a blockage in the flow of vital energy resulting in emotional, mental, and physical illness.
disorder, schara (schä·rä dis·ōrˑ·der),
n in Tibetan medicine, a medical condition exhibited by tense and aggressive behaviors. During a careful interview, the patient may reveal a contemptuous and arrogant mind, continually scheming and plotting activities. Perfectionist and workaholic tendencies may be indicated. On the physical level, the patient be warm or have excessive perspiration, increased thirst, a frequent need to urinate, nausea, and purging. Body language might reveal impatience with rushed speech patterns. Body odor may be pungent, and breath may smell putrid or similar to stomach acid. A yellow-green or yellow coat covers the tongue.
disorder, seasonal affective,
n a chronic disorder in which symptoms fluctuate with the level of light exposure. In particular, persons affected are normal during the summer months while having feelings of depression during the winter months. Melatonin and light therapy are two common alternative treatments often prescribed. Also called
SAD.
disorder, upper limb,
n collective term for various conditions characterized by pain, stiffness, or immobility of the arms, hands, and/or shoulders.
disorders, autonomic dysregulation (ˈ·tō·nˑ·mik disˈ·re·gy·lāˑ·shn dis·ōrˑ·derz),
n.pl in medical acupuncture, a loose categorization for medical conditions that are in a premorbid state. Indicated by bowel dysfunction, sleep disturbances, and anxiety.
disorders, immune dysregulation (i·myōōnˑ disˈ·re·gy·lāˑ·shn dis·ōrˑ·derz),
n.pl in medical acupuncture, a loose categorization for medical conditions that are in a premorbid state. Indicated by recurring inflammatory and infectious conditions that do not have any specific immunodeficiency. Recurrent pharyngitis, sinusitis, gastroenteritis, bronchitis, and viral illnesses are examples.
disorders, pelvic floor,
n.pl problems originating in the muscles of the pelvic floor, including but not limited to urinary incontinence, pain, constipation, pain during intercourse, muscle tension-related fecal incontinence, and so on; sometimes can be treated with biofeedback.
disorders, Type M (musculoskeletal) (musˈ·ky·lō·skeˑ·l·tl),
n.pl chiropractic classification for musculoskeletal ailments such as sacroiliac joint dysfunction, tension headache, facet syndrome, strain, and sprain injuries.
disorders, Type N (neurogenic) (ne·rō·je·nik),
n.pl chiropractic classification for ailments with neurological origins, such as Bell's Palsy, migraine, nystagmus, and Tourette's syndrome.
disorders, Type O (organic, stress-related),
n.pl chiropractic classification for ailments that result from stress and organic causes, such as bladder and bowel dysfunction, hypertension, infantile colic, headache, angina, asthma, and gastritis.

dis·or·der

(dis-ōr'dĕr)
A disturbance of function, structure, or both, resulting from a genetic or embryonic failure in development or from exogenous factors such as poison, trauma ordisease.

disorder(s),

n derangement of function.
disorder, bipolar,
n a major mood disorder characterized by alternating periods of mania or elation and depression. Formerly called
manic-depressive disorder.
disorder, body dysmorphic (BBD)
(dismôr´fik),
n a mental disorder in which an otherwise physiologically healthy person obsesses about an imaginary physical defect.
disorder(s), coagulation,
n any one of the hemorrhagic diseases caused by a deficiency of plasma thromboplastin formation (deficiency of antihemophilic factor, plasma thromboplastic antecedent, Hageman factor, Stuart factor), deficiency of thrombin formation (deficiency of prothrombin, factor V, factor VII, Stuart factor), and deficiency of fibrin formation (afibrinogenemia, fibrinogenopenia).
disorder, conversion,
n uncontrolled change or loss of control of physical function due to a mental, not physical, need or conflict.
disorder, cumulative trauma,
n a disorder of the musculature and skeleton after repetitive strain injuries to muscles, tendons, joints, bones, and nerves.
disorder, panic,
n a disorder marked by repeated panic attacks and fear, which interrupts normal functioning.
disorder(s), periodic,
n.pl a variety of disorders of unknown cause that have in common periodic recurrence of manifestations. Such disorders are usually benign, resist treatment, often begin in infancy, and occasionally have a hereditary pattern. Included are periodic sialorrhea, neutropenia, arthralgia, fever, purpura (anaphylactoid purpura), edema (angioneurotic edema), abdominalgia, and periodic parotitis (recurrent parotitis).
disorder, pervasive developmental,
n a disorder of behavioral and sensory impairment that generally appears during infancy or early childhood and continues to affect the individual's ability to communicate and interact with others throughout his or her life. See also autism.
disorder(s), platelet,
n.pl a hemorrhagic disease caused by an abnormality of the blood platelets (e.g., thrombocytopenia, thrombasthenia).
disorder, posttraumatic stress,
n a condition characterized by acute or recurring anxiety which has been brought about as the result of experiencing a traumatic event, such as a natural disaster, automobile accident, terrorist attack, military combat, rape, physical torture, or childhood sexual abuse. Symptoms may include flashbacks, nightmares, mild to severe depression, and panic attacks.
disorder(s), psychophysiologic, autonomic, and visceral,
n the standard psychiatric nomenclature for what are commonly known as psychomotor disorders. The disorders are disturbances of visceral function, secondary to chronic attitude and long-continued reaction to stress. These disorders may occur in any organ innervated by the autonomic nervous system, since overactivity or underactivity of that system as a result of stress appears to trigger the disorder. See also disease, psychosomatic.
disorder(s), visual,
n.pl disorders that may result from injury or disease to the eyeball and its adnexa, the retina, or the cornea (e.g., contusions of the orbit and eyelids, opacities of the lens, corneal scars, vascular changes to the retina). These peripheral disorders are effective in causing partial or total loss of vision in one or both eyes. They are simple, concrete, and fundamental. One sees or one does not see, and gray visions are generally quantitative differences that affect the perception of light and shadow and color and form. They may also result from injury or disease to the optic tract fibers, optic chiasma, cerebral pathways, and visual cortex in the occipital region of the cerebrum. These are qualitative deviations from normal, and the symptoms include visual field defects such as tubular vision found in hysteria, complete blindness in one or both eyes as a result of optic nerve injury, and hemianopsia, in which vision may be lost in one half of the visual field of one or both eyes. Others include night and day blindness, color blindness, and the serious visual agnosia that results from trauma, tumor, or vascular disorders in the visual cortex of the cerebrum.
disorder(s), cognitive impairment,
n.pl the mental disorders distinguished by a limitation of mental functions (e.g., memory, comprehension, and judgment).
disorder(s), dissociative,
n.pl the mental disorders distinguished by the psychologically induced, distinct partition of separate mental functions from normal behavior or consciousness (e.g., dissociative amnesia and depersonalization disorder).
disorder(s), factitious
(faktish´əs),
n.pl the mental disorders distinguished by the self-induced creation of artificial physical or mental symptoms to assume the role of a sick individual.
disorder(s), feeding,
n.pl conditions distinguished by an inability to eat sufficiently, a continual need to consume abnormal items of food or substances lacking nutrients, or frequent vomiting episodes without any indications of a gastrointestinal infection.
disorder(s), impulse control,
n.pl the mental disorders distinguished by an uncontrollable tendency to commit an unplanned behavior (e.g., pathologic gambling, kleptomania, and pyromania).
disorder(s), sexual,
n.pl disorders of sexual performance or desire, which may include sexual dysfunction, feelings of discomfort about one's gender, and perverse sexual urges or activities. Also called paraphilia.
disorder(s), sleep,
n.pl conditions characterized by a disruption in normal sleeping patterns, which may be the result of serious medical conditions, including breathing difficulties or thyroid disorders, or external factors such as stress or substance abuse. Manifestations include insomnia, sleep apnea, and narcolepsy.
disorder(s), somatoform
n.pl disorders characterized by symptoms that seem to suggest the presence of an illness, but for which there is no physical proof. Often may be attributed to unresolved emotional conflicts. Types include conversion disorder, hypochondriasis, body dysmorphic disorder, and pain disorder.
disorder(s), substance-related,
n.pl conditions or illnesses that may be directly attributed to overuse of drugs, alcohol, nicotine, or caffeine and may also include nutritional deficiencies, cardiovascular disease, oral lesions, liver disease, and sleep disorders.
disorder(s), tic,
n.pl conditions characterized by involuntary and sometimes violent muscle spasms, including Tourette's syndrome and chronic motor or vocal tic disorders.

disorder

a derangement or abnormality of function. Used as a euphemism when it is not certain that the abnormality is in fact a disease, or when public relations suggest that the word disease is likely to be inflammatory or upsetting.

Patient discussion about disorder

Q. My sister has this disease and she works at a daycare.Can this disease be airbourne? Children come to the daycare sick. Some of her co-workers were out from work because they got sick from some of the children.

A. I don't know which disease you are talking about specifically, but certainly viruses and bacterias from sick children can infect people around them, especially close contacts like workers in a day-care center. The best way to avoid infections are usually washing hands multiple time a day and after holding the kids, this also helps to not infect the other kids around.

Q. Mood- disorder? What will happen to the people who refuse treatment? I know someone whose mother got diagnosed with "mood- disorder" and now this person says that she don't have it. But all her brothers and sisters have this, and are on medication. Is there a way to save our family heritage?

A. well done, i will start to collect with the agreement of Iri possible causes for disorders (bipolar, mood, whatever you want to call it) to help people to recognize themselves. they all can start in the moment we are in the embryo. parental conflicts, aggressions, sexual behaviours, drugs, alcohol, smoking in abondance can affect us from this moment on.

Q. Whats schizoaffective disease its a mental disease

A. Schitzoaffective is a mental disease that causes symptoms of schitzophrenia and symptoms of bi-polar. patients see things, hear voices, are moody,etc.Patients go into a high mania and a low mania.

More discussions about disorder
References in periodicals archive ?
However, they would plead guilty to obstruction and disorderly behaviour.
The agreement is the result of a complaint initiated under the authority of HUD Secretary Julian Castro alleging that the city of Berlin discriminated against women when it enacted an ordinance requiring landlords to evict tenants cited by police three or more times for disorderly action or risk being fined and/or losing their rental license.
The victim said he asked why he was shoved and PC Tulloch said he was being arrested for drunk and disorderly behaviour.
Mustafa Karwan, of Roker Avenue, Sunderland, was found guilty of disorderly conduct on Metro premises at Newcastle Central Metro Station, on June 25, and was fined PS400 and ordered to pay PS90 costs.
Shane Sinfield-Deynes, of Vale Road, Rhyl, admitted being drunk and disorderly in the town, at a special weekend Magistrates' court hearing in Llandudno.
Secretary RTA has appealed to public to cooperate with authority and avoid parking their vehicles on roads and parks because disorderly parking is increasing the traffic problems.
Tom Nelson and charged with disturbing the peace and being a disorderly person.
Nicole "Snooki" Polizzi had a similar arrest during filming of the series in 2010 for disturbing the peace, disorderly conduct and criminal annoyance of others.
How was I so disorderly you know any different from just a happy parent?
A top regulator in the UK has asked commercial banks to be prepared for a disorderly break up of the euro zone, or the exit of some countries from the common-currency league.
Schofield, 23, of Bishop's Court, Berry Brow, pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct.
Gillian Debra Tero, 38, of Chestnut Square, Stockton, fined pounds 50 with pounds 115 costs for being drunk and disorderly.