dismiss

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dismiss

Etymology: L, dis + mittere, to send
(in law) to discharge or dispose of an action, suit, or motion trial. dismissal, n.

dismiss

(dis-mis′) [L. dimissus, dismissus, sent away]
In law, to end a legal dispute without a trial, e.g., because the judge rules that the accusation does not merit consideration.
dismissal (-mis′ăl)
References in classic literature ?
A very foolish thought--it could not be Hetty; but the only way of dismissing such nonsense from his head was to go and see WHO it was, for his fancy only got nearer and nearer to belief while he stood there listening.
We found it without much difficulty, when, dismissing her, I proceeded to examine the place.
You will see him with the rest of us, in the same manner, and, as much as you can, dismissing the recollection of everything unpleasant.
Blanche herself that, after dismissing the Prince and hearing of the General's tears, she bethought her of going to comfort the old man, and had just arrived for the purpose when I entered.
dismissing with a gesture both the gentleman and the valet de chambre, who passed out into the next apartment.
If there is a good reason, in honor or decency, for dismissing her from my thoughts forever, I am perfectly willing to do it.
The worst they can say of her is that she discovered it, that she had sent away a man in love directly she found out that his love was not worth having; that she had told him to go and look for his crown, and that, after dismissing him she had remained generously faithful to his cause, in her person and fortune.
Dismissing this, however, she busied herself with sprinkling the linen dried during the daytime, in company with her nine-year-old brother Abraham, and her sister Eliza-Louisa of twelve and a half, call "'Liza-Lu," the youngest ones being put to bed.
To-night the pressure of accumulated misgivings sent the scale drooping toward despair, and her indifference was the more chilling after the flush of joy into which she had plunged him by dismissing Denis Eady.
It has engendered or confirmed in him a habit of putting off--and trusting to this, that, and the other chance, without knowing what chance--and dismissing everything as unsettled, uncertain, and confused.