dislocation of the hip


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dislocation of the hip

Etymology: L, dis, apart, locare, to place; AS, hype
displacement of the femoral head out of the hip joint, usually accompanied by pain, edema, rigidity, shortening of the leg, and loss of function. It may be congenital or acquired. Types of hip dislocation include obturator dislocation, in which the femoral head lies in the obturator foramen; perineal dislocation, in which the femoral head is displaced into the perineum; sciatic dislocation, in which the femoral head lies in the sciatic notch; and subpubic dislocation, in which the femoral head is displaced anteriorly.

dislocation of the hip

A dislocation of the head of the femur from its normal location in the acetabulum. It is very often accompanied by a fracture.

Symptoms

The dislocation is characterized by pain, rigidity, and loss of function. The dislocation may be obvious by the abnormal position in which the leg is held, seen, or felt.

Diagnosis

The person has great difficulty in straightening the hip and leg. The knee on the injured side resists being pointed inward toward the other knee and typically appears in a position of flexion, adduction, and internal rotation.

First Aid

The patient should be placed on a large frame, gurney, or support, such as that used for a fractured back. A large pad or pillow should be placed under the knee of the affected side. The patient should be treated for shock if required.

See also: dislocation
References in periodicals archive ?
Cozen, "Posterior fracture dislocation of the hip with fractures of the femoral head," Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, vol.
Etiology, pathogenesis and possible prevention of congenital dislocation of the hip.
61) described the use of somatosensory evoked potentials by the common peroneal nerve in correctly reducing the femoral head in the acetabulum during surgical procedures for the congenital dislocation of the hip.
Traumatic dislocation and fracture dislocation of the hip.
1968) Etiology, pathogenesis and possible prevention of congenital dislocation of the hip.
Both developmental dislocation of the hip and impingement can result in osteoarthritis.
A unique feature of the SUPERCAP[R] approach is that it does not require surgical dislocation of the hip during the procedure, resulting in maximum preservation of the surrounding soft tissue.
10 The patient was placed in a full lateral position and the transtrochanteric surgical dislocation of the hip performed.
Double-chevron subtrochanteric shortening derotational femoral osteotomy combined with total hip arthroplasty for the treatment of complete congenital dislocation of the hip in the adult.
Karahan, "Bilateral obturator dislocation of the hip," Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, vol.
Outcome at forty-five years after open reduction and innominate osteotomy for late-presenting developmental dislocation of the hip.