disjunct


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disjunct

  1. having body regions separated by a deep constriction.
  2. relating to a form of geographical distribution where potentially interbreeding populations are separated.
References in periodicals archive ?
Disjunct pattern Physiological demands vary with tempo: fast (Can be slow or fast disjunct is agility.
Within Cyperaceae, homogenized inflorescences can be recognized disjunct (Fig.
The Alpine shrew (Sorex alpinus Schinz, 1837) is a small soricomorph with disjunct range in the Alps, the NW Balkans, the Carpathians, and some isolated mountain areas in Germany, Czech Republic and Poland (Spitzenberger 1990, Meinig 2004).
Like Monomachidae, Chiromyzinae, their hosts, also have disjunct distribution in the southern hemisphere.
For Badiou, this declaration puts in circulation within the Situation the truth of the gap that separates the two sexualized positions: "A Two that proceeds amorously is specifically the name of the disjunct as apprehended in its disjunction" (189).
Scholars of a more critical bent, on the other hand, will probably be more concerned to interrogate the religion/spirituality distinction, the significance of each disjunct, the historical/discursive processes that made such a distinction possible in the first place, and the motivation underlying the distinction and subsequent classification of the Pad Yatra as spiritual.
sentence adverb--an adverb that is used to express the speaker's or writer's opinion about the content of a clause or sentence; also called a disjunct (see "Editorialize with Sentence Adverbs" AMWA J.
Crucially, though, it may be the approach to poetry that is different, for poetry is not considered to be an autonomous or esoteric art form that is disjunct and detached from daily life in Pakistan.
There exist other species of Cladonia that show a disjunct distribution similar to that of C.
Disjunct populations and new records of other species recently described for the southwest Yukon suggest 1) that this region is understudied and a potential refugium for species characteristic of different biogeographic influences and 2) that this region may be changing considerably in response to recent rapid environmental change, which has influenced species distribution, abundance, and phenology.
Although not well understood, the separation of the species into two subspecies proposed by Allard (1991) appears to be supported by the disjunct distribution of the two known populations and a number of morphological characters.
Several aquatic heteropteran species have seemingly disjunct distributions, with broad distributions in central Mexico and outlier populations in central Arizona (Menke, 1960; Menke and Truxal, 1966; Polhemus, 1966; Menke, 1977).