disinhibit

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disinhibit

(dĭs′ĭn-hĭb′ĭt)
tr.v. disinhib·ited, disinhib·iting, disinhib·its
1. To free (a person) from inhibitions.
2. To terminate or reverse the inhibition of (a neuron, for example).
References in periodicals archive ?
Social--17%: members consume one or two drinks, once or twice a week or less often, to socialize and to a lesser extent to enhance how they are feeling or to become disinhibited.
This finding is an important contribution to the literature because it supports the hypothesis that sexual risk-taking is partly explained by disinhibited behaviours which emerge from dispositional impulsivity and insensitivity.
If you tote your legal gun into a bar, an athletic event, or a problematic marriage, it will be easy for you to pull it in either instance when drunk and disinhibited, if your inclinations run strongly in that direction.
One speculation is that as frontal lobe activity decreases, the areas of the brain that support mediumistic writing are further disinhibited (similar to alcohol or drug use) so that the overall complexity can increase.
Disinhibited attachment at age 6 and 11 years: Developmental course in institutionally-deprived and non-deprived adoptees.
The orbitofrontal (disinhibited) syndrome includes disinhibited and impulsive behaviors, inappropriate affect, euphoria, puerility, emotional lability, poor judgment, distractibility, increased energy, aggression, and violence (8).
Sharing very personal information with others is one feature of disinhibited behaviour online - revealing intimate facts to strangers via blogs or instant messaging that would seem inappropriate if meeting them face to face.
Since disinhibitory cues are generally stronger and more immediate than inhibitory cues, disinhibited social behavior is likely to occur.
a powerful person who has been imbibing all night and then goes into an anonymous chat room) is likely to be the most disinhibited, for better or for worse.
Far from engaging (even critically) the activist project of identity politics, Trecartin's work--his disinhibited bodies coursing through the monetized cultural sites of "our" contemporary world--offers a vision of value-added identitarianism.
Impulsive, disinhibited and unusual behaviors can result in rejection from peer groups.
Specific behaviors--such as expressing a desire to "go home," pacing and wandering, episodic physical aggression, calling out and engaging in repetitive speech, displaying disinhibited behavior, and displaying behaviors associated with sundown syndrome--are all addressed by using the experiential approach.